Certificate for Accounting Technician

Accounting Technicians keep a variety of financial records in businesses. They prepare journal entries, financial statements, bank reconciliations, payroll records, and conduct stocktaking and inventory valuation reports.

This one-year programme is designed to prepare students to enter local businesses as accounting assistants in possession of the latest techniques in the field. It covers a variety of related areas that influence business organisations such as computing, management, and office skills and provides extensive data entry experience.
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  • CT-ACAST Programme Details Open or Close

    CURRICULUM TOTAL CREDITS: 34

    YEAR 1
    First Semester - 18 Credits
    ENG 0044 Communication for Industry 1 3 Credits
    MAT 1034 Business Mathematics 3 Credits
    MGN 1017 Foundations of Business 3 Credits
    CIS 1120 Intro to Business Applications of Computers 3 Credits
    ACC 1041 Practical Accounting Procedures I 3 Credits
    CSC 1100 Strategies for Success I 2 Credits
    PED Physical Education OR
    RSO Registered Student Organisation 1 Credit


    Second Semester - 16 Credits
    ENG 0045 Communication for Industry II 3 Credits
    MGN 1015 Accounting in Action 3 Credits
    OFA 1040 Communication and Presentation Skills 2 Credits
    MGN 1016 Office Work Placement 1 Credit
    ACC 1042 Practical Accounting Procedures II 3 Credits
    ACC 1043 Accounting and New Technology 3 Credits
    OFA 1060 Office Application Certification 1 Credit

  • Credit Course Descriptions Open or Close

    ACC AHS ART ASC BIO CHM CIS CKN CSC CSM CUL CYS ECM ECO EDU EES ELN ENG FAB FLM HIS HMT HVA INS LAW MAT MGN MSC MVT NCC NUR OFA PED PHL PHY PLM PSY REL RSO SOC SOW SPA SSC TEC TMM TSM

    ACC 1041 Practical Accounting Procedures I

    3 credits

    This course is designed as an introduction to analysis, classification, and recording of business transactions in a manual environment with emphasis on the complete accounting cycle for a service business. Includes preparation of financial statements and bank reconciliations. This course is a certificate course and will not normally transfer into degree programmes.

    ACC 1042 Practical Accounting Procedures II

    3 credits

    An advanced practical bookkeeping course that encompasses prepaid assets, uncollectible accounts receivable, plant assets and depreciation, notes payable and receivable, accrued revenues and expenses, bookkeeping for Corporations, cost volume profit analysis, and budgeting. The course also gives students real-life experience with accounting business simulation and working papers. This course is a certificate course and will not normally transfer into degree programmes. Prerequisite: ACC 1041

    ACC 1043 Accounting and Technology

    3 credits

    This course is a lab oriented learning course designed especially to empower the student with the skills needed to provide technical support for the financial administration of the organisation. The course is made up of four modules: word processing, spreadsheet, presentation and file management practices. It is strongly focused on the use of spreadsheets in accounting functions. To complete the course, the student will have to demonstrate his or her competency with lab work that addresses the fusion between real world accounting and current software applications. This course is a certificate course and will not normally transfer into degree programmes. Prerequisite: CIS1120, ACC 1041 MGN1017. Corequisites: ACC 1042, MGN1015, MGN1016

    ACC 1135 Accounting I

    3 credits

    An introduction to the basic theory and applications of contemporary financial accounting, including recording of transactions, measurement of income and the preparation of financial statements. Prerequisite: MAT 0015 or ACC1041 or equivalent.

    ACC 1140 Computerised Accounting

    3 credits

    This course offers an introduction to financial applications that are commonly computerised in today’s business environment by providing practical training using theoretical accounting knowledge. This course takes a user perspective by illustrating how accounting information is both created, maintained and used for analysis, problem-solving and decision-making. Prerequisite: CIS 1120. Corequisite: ACC 1145.

    ACC 1145 Accounting II

    3 credits

    An introduction to managerial accounting. Topics include bonds and long-term notes payable, investments, cash flows, analysis of financial statements, cost accounting, cost-volume-profit analysis, budgeting and managerial decision-making. Prerequisite: ACC 1135.

    ACC 2201 Intermediate Accounting I

    3 credits

    A detailed and in-depth study of accounting principles, practices and concepts with emphasis on their application to income determination and asset valuation. Prerequisite: C standing in ACC 1135 and ACC 1145.

    ACC 2202 Intermediate Accounting II

    3 credits

    A continuation of ACC 2201 to include the accounting for liabilities, leases, shareholders’ equity accounts, consolidations and equity accounting. Prerequisite: ACC 2201.

    ACC 2253 Management Accounting I

    3 credits

    A detailed study of cost accounting to include a study of job order accounting, budgeting and standard costing. Prerequisite: C standing in ACC 1145.

    AHS 1126 Introduction to Art History I

    3 credits

    An historical survey of the development of western art and architecture from the earliest times to the Renaissance. Corequisite: ENG 1111

    AHS 1127 Introduction to Art History II

    3 credits

    An historical survey of the development of western art and architecture from the Renaissance to the Modern Era. Prerequisite: AHS 1126

    AHS 2280 Nineteenth Century Art

    3 credits

    A study of European art, 1800 to 1855, including painting, sculpture, architecture and decorative arts from the Neo-Classical and Romantic periods to the height of the Victorian era. Primary topics and artists: Delacroix and romanticism in France; Turner and British romantic landscape painting; the pre-Raphaelites, Courbet and the French realist, Goya. Prerequisites: AHS 1126 and AHS 1127.

    AHS 2290 Postcolonial Visual Art

    3 credits



    ART 1101 Introductory Drawing

    3 credits

    A foundation course in drawing. Focuses on the development of the student’s awareness of line, tone, proportion, spatial relationships and rhythm. Subject matter will include still life, man-made and natural objects, landscape and non-figurative themes.

    ART 1102 Introductory Painting

    3 credits

    A foundation course in painting. Focuses on the development of the student’s awareness of tone, colour, composition, and spatial relationships. Subject matter will include still life, natural objects, landscape and non-figurative themes. ART 1101 is highly recommended.

    ART 1120 Two-dimensional Design

    3 credits

    A theoretical and practical exploration of the principles of two-dimensional design (line, shape, form, and composition) along with the investigation of various materials and tools, including the computer, so as to establish a framework in which students can solve various design problems.

    ART 1135 Introduction to Colour and Composition

    3 credits

    A theoretical and practical study of colour and composition in art and in nature.

    ART 1140 Introduction to Media Arts

    3 credits

    Introduction to media arts, using the video camera to explore the making of film. Emphasis will be placed on the basic principles of using a video camera, lighting and editing, and students will be expected to use the video to make a film presentation.

    ART 1221 Introductory Sculpture

    3 credits

    A theoretical and practical exploration of the principles of three-dimensional design (line, shape, form, mass, space and composition) focusing on traditional sculpting methods (clay, carving, mould making, assemblage, etc.) along with the investigation of various materials and tools, including the computer, so as to establish a framework in which students can solve various design problems. Prerequisite: ART 1120 or permission of the lecturer

    ART 2178 Figure Drawing

    3 credits

    A study of the proportions and anatomy of the human form from the model. Emphasis on line and contour in short poses. Prerequisite: ART 1101 or permission of the lecturer.

    ART 2211 Intermediate Drawing

    3 credits

    A continuation of the training in drawing skills. Students will explore a number of drawing media such as graphite, charcoal, pastels and ink. Training also continues with the development of hand-eye coordination. Prerequisite: ART 1101.

    ART 2212 Intermediate Drawing II

    3 credits



    ART 2221 Intermediate Sculpture

    3 credits

    A continuation of ART 1221 Introductory Sculpture with opportunity for more individual expression and refinement while focusing on contemporary sculpting practices (fabrication, installation art, public art, performance art, etc.) along with the investigation of various materials and tools, including the computer, so as to establish a framework in which students can solve various design problems. Prerequisite: ART 1221 Introductory Sculpture or permission of the lecturer

    ART 2230 Intermediate Painting

    3 credits

    A more detailed study in painting, using acrylics, oils, or watercolour to explore inherent qualities in each medium. Emphasis will be placed on tone, colour and composition. Prerequisite: ART 1102.

    ART 2235 Intermediate Colour and Composition

    3 credits

    A more detailed study of colour phenomena and its application to art, such as transparency, translucency, iridescence and luminescence. Students will be expected to apply this information to their own works of art. Prerequisite: ART 1135.

    ART 2250 Introduction to Graphic Design

    3 credits

    Introduction to graphic design with emphasis on layout and design, colour in graphics, typography, the printing process and the application of the computer to these processes. Prerequisite: ART 1120 and 1135

    ASC 1101 Introduction to Actuarial Science

    3 credits

    An introduction to various operational aspects of the insurance and reinsurance industry in the sectors of property, casualty and life. The various roles of the actuary within the insurance organisation as well as the basic methodologies of actuarial pricing and reserving are emphasised. Prerequisite: Six credits of mathematics, including MAT 2233

    BIO 1102 Introduction to the Life Sciences

    4 credits

    The focus initially is on methodology and major concepts in the life sciences. Elementary studies at the cell level for animals and plants will involve some related basic chemistry and physics. Laboratory techniques will be developed. This survey course is appropriate for those students who do not plan to specialise in the biological sciences. (It is also appropriate for mature students or persons with post-secondary or broad general experience but without formal science preparation). Prerequisite: A grade of C or better in BIO 0013.

    BIO 1104 General Human Biology

    4 credits

    The second half of two courses for non-biology majors needing to fulfil a natural science requirement. This course will focus on basic human gross anatomy, basic physiology and some basic pathology. Prerequisite: A grade of C or better in BIO 0013.

    BIO 1121 Principles of Biology I

    4 credits



    BIO 1122 Principles of Biology II

    4 credits

    Continuation of BIO 1121. This course will further explore variation and biological continuity through genetics, development and ecology as well as provide an introduction to basic physiological systems. Laboratory. Prerequisite: BIO 1121

    BIO 2210 Cellular Biology

    4 credits

    A comprehensive survey of the structure and function of the unit of life. Emphasis is placed on molecular constituents and inter-cellular components. Cellular modifications and the cellular nature of organisms will be examined. Laboratory. Prerequisites: BIO 1122 and CHM 0013; Corequisite Required: MAT 1141

    BIO 2211 Anatomy and Physiology I

    4 credits

    Exploration of the intricate functions of the human body with emphasis on the physiological functions of the integumentary, skeletal, muscular, nervous and the endocrine systems. Integration of the human body will be studied as a whole focusing on the major theme of homeostasis. Laboratory. Prerequisite: BIO 1122

    BIO 2212 Anatomy and Physiology II

    4 credits

    A continuation of Anatomy and Physiology I, with emphasis on the cardiovascular system, the lymphatic system and immunity, the respiratory system, the digestive system and metabolism, the urinary system, fluid/electrolyte and acid/base balance, and the reproductive systems. Integration of the human body will be studied as a whole focusing on the major theme of homeostasis. Case study investigations will be explored. Laboratory. Prerequisite: BIO 2211

    BIO 2222 Medical Microbiology

    4 credits

    A course designed for students intending to pursue further studies in the biological sciences. This course is structured to provide a comprehensive introduction to medical microbiology. The aim is to foster in-depth knowledge of infectious microorganisms, their biochemistry and how they infect the organ systems of the human body. Basic microbiological principles with a focus on taxonomy, cell morphology and human pathologies caused by microorganisms. Prerequisite: BIO 1122

    BIO 2250 Medical Nutrition

    4 credits



    BIO 2298 Special Topics in Biology

    4 credits

    Provides an opportunity for in-depth study at the 2000-level of a topic available as a special offering. This may be material that has been initially explored at the 1000-level or new material for whose development and exploration there has been provided an appropriate base via a 1000-level course. Prerequisite: Appropriate 1000-level courses and/or a 2000 level course relevant to the topic.

    CHM 1111 Principles of Chemistry I

    4 credits

    A survey of fundamental principles of physical chemistry including atomic structure, chemical bonding, molecular structure and gas laws. Laboratory. Prerequisites: A grade of C or better in CHM 0013 and MAT 0015, or alternatives in Chemistry and Mathematics. Corequisite Required: MAT 1105

    CHM 1112 Principles of Chemistry II

    4 credits

    A continuation of a survey of fundamental principles of physical chemistry including chemical and phase equilibrium, acid-base equilibrium, precipitation reactions, chemistry of hydrocarbons. Laboratory. Prerequisite: CHM 1111

    CHM 2256 Organic Chemistry I

    4 credits

    A broad introduction to the behaviour of aliphatic and aromatic carbon compounds, including hydrocarbons, alcohols, aldehydes and ketones, stereo-isomerism, optical activity and spectroscopy. Laboratory. Prerequisite: CHM 1112

    CHM 2257 Organic Chemistry II

    4 credits

    A continuation of an introduction to the behaviour of aliphatic and aromatic carbon compounds including acids, amines, amino acids, carbohydrates, proteins, nucleic acids and natural products. Laboratory. Prerequisite: CHM 2256

    CIS 1120 Introduction to Business Applications of Computers

    3 credits

    Intended to provide students with an initial exposure to the main areas of software used in business: word processing, spreadsheets and presentation software. Additionally, an introduction to database management will be provided. A consideration of business application software in the context of the overall computer system will also be covered to include an overview of computer design, networking, operating systems and hardware options. This course is also suitable for those students studying programmes in social sciences or science.

    CIS 1125 Introduction to Computers and Information Technology

    3 credits

    This entry-level survey course explores computers and their applications. Students are provided with an appreciation of what computers are, how they work and what tasks can be accomplished using them. Topics include the impact of computers on society; computer hardware including CPU, disks, other storage devices and input and output devices; computer software including data representation, data structures, operating systems, application programmes and database management systems; introduction to programming and programming languages; computer communications including the Internet, the world-wide web and e-mail; a brief history of computing; computer security, privacy and ethics. Prerequisite: A grade of a C or better in ENG 0012. Fundamental Computer Literacy or CIS 1120 as a corequisites.

    CIS 1130 Data Management

    3 credits

    This course will feature the application of the SQL query language for managing and creating databases. A typical report and application generator will also be studied. Provides essential theoretical and practical knowledge required by those who expect to be involved in the storage and retrieval of information. Prerequisites: CIS 1120 or CIS 1125 and ENG 0012 and MAT 0015.

    CIS 1155 Programming for Information Systems

    3 credits

    This course is an introduction to the basic principles of computer programming. It focuses on developing problem solving skills through writing programmes in Visual Basic. Students learn to develop graphical user interfaces (GUI’s) and use basic programming language structures to develop algorithms for solving various kinds of problems. Prerequisites: MAT 0015 and CIS 1125

    CIS 1180 Computer Information Systems Internship

    3 credits

    Work experience in a selected local business. The experience will be in a computer-related area of the business. The precise nature of the experience will be agreed upon after discussion between the College and management of the business. Prerequisites: A minimum GPA 2.0 or higher in all computer information technology programme courses necessary as prerequisites; CIS 1120, CIS 1125, CIS 1130, CIS 2278 and ECM 1101.

    CIS 2231 System Analysis and Design

    3 credits

    Intended to provide an understanding of the scope and nature of information systems, techniques applied to systems analysis and design and of the development life-cycle of a computer system project. Topics include the need for information and management systems, the human aspects of system development, fact-finding and structured systems analysis, design for real-time and distributed systems, computer hardware and software acquisition, system implementation techniques, and case studies. Prerequisite: CIS 1125 Corequisites CIS 1130 and ENG 0012 and MAT 0015.

    CIS 2278 Microcomputer Hardware and System Software

    3 credits

    Students study the installation, configuration, proper usage and maintenance of common hardware and software components of an IBM compatible microcomputer, including memory, disk drives, expansion cards, power supplies, system level software, diagnostic utilities, operating systems, and major applications. Typical I/O peripherals such as video cameras, microphones, speakers, keyboards, printers and the mouse are studied. Prerequisite: CIS 1125.

    CIS 2290 Networking Technologies

    3 credits

    This course covers the technology underlying data-communications systems such as transmission media, modulation and demodulation, multiplexing, packet switching, hardware, software and network operations. Topics include fibre optics, the Integrated Services Digital Network (ISDN), T-1 and T-3 multiplex, the open system interconnection (OSI) model, and integrated voice-data equipment. Prerequisite: CIS 2278.

    CIS 2297 Security Fundamentals and Policies

    3 credits

    Offers in-depth coverage of the current risks and threats to an organisation’s data together with a structured way of addressing the safeguarding of these critical electronic assets. The course provides a foundation for those responsible for protecting network services, devices, traffic and data. Additionally, the course provides the broad-based knowledge necessary to prepare students for further study in other specialised security fields. Prerequisite: CIS 2290, CIS 2278

    CKN 1102 Kitchen Theory and Practice 1

    4 credits

    Cuisine and related theory in preparation for hospitality management. Topics include preparation, cooking, presentation, and sanitation management.

    CSC 1100 Strategies for Success

    2 credits

    To provide students with comprehensive guidance to make successful adjustments to college life through career awareness and academic planning. The topics presented include career planning, transferring to institutions overseas, preparing for work placement, assessing individual personal skills, and choosing healthy lifestyle behaviours. Students will be required to prepare and present a portfolio outlining identified goals.

    CSM 1101 Computer Skills Module

    2 credits

    This course is designed to introduce the student to basic computer software applications in Microsoft Word, Excel and PowerPoint.

    CUL 1020 English for Culinary Arts

    3 credits

    The following skills are contained in this module: reviewing of basic English skills; reading and understanding charts and instructions; writing reports, requisitions, orders, invoices, menus, rosters, function sheets/requisitions; writing a resume’ and a cover letter; developing interviewing and speaking skills. This course is a certificate course and will not normally transfer into degree programmes.

    CUL 1102 Introduction to Culinary Arts

    1 credits

    This course introduces students to the history of culinary arts. Students will study kitchen equipment, organisation, chef’s tools, terminology, sanitation and conform to the industry standard of personal grooming, hygiene and professional presentation. Students must complete first aid and fire safety training.

    CUL 1103 Culinary Mathematics

    3 credits

    The following skills are contained in this module: use decimals and whole numbers; use estimation techniques; calculate cost, yield, ratios and proportions.

    CUL 1104 Sanitation & Safety

    2 credits

    An introduction to the fundamentals of food and environmental sanitation. The student will examine the origins of food-borne illness, prevention measures and the implementation of proper sanitation practices. The ServSafe certification test will be offered upon completion of this course.

    CUL 1105 Meat Identification & Fabrication

    2 credits

    Students will identify and fabricate basic meats including primal, sub-primal cuts and kitchen ready cuts, identify USDA inspection stamps, government yield and quality grades for all carcasses. Students will practice methods of tenderizing, marinating and cooking techniques for all specific cuts including offal, game and poultry. Prerequisite: CUL 1102 Corequisite: CUL 1104

    CUL 1106 Purchasing & Product Identification

    3 credits

    Students will learn methods for controlling costs as they apply to the selection and procurement of food, beverages, equipment, contract services and supplies with primary focus on product identification, supplier selection, ordering, receiving, storing and issuing process. This course prepares students to write an internationally recognised test.

    CUL 1108 Introduction to the Preparation of Stocks, Soups & Sauces

    2 credits

    This course introduces classical production methods for the basic stocks used in the production of most soups and sauces. This includes production of the Grand Sauces and various derivatives, basic clear, cream, puree and international soups, as well as emulsified sauces. Prerequisite: CUL 1102 Corequisite: CUL 1104

    CUL 1109 Introduction to Vegetable & Starch Cookery

    2 credits

    This course introduces students to classification, storage and preparation of the fundamental vegetables and provides the basics of preparing potatoes, starches, legumes and pastas including international starch dishes. Students will learn proper knife cuts and shaping of vegetables. Prerequisite: CUL 1102 Corequisite: CUL 1104

    CUL 1110 Introduction to Cooking Methods

    2 credits

    The course introduces students to the vast variety of cooking methods, and the various types of heat transfer, including both moist and dry heat. The proper choice of ingredients associated with each cooking method, and the correct choice of tools and equipment will be discussed. Careful attention is placed on the proper application of technique throughout each step from preparation to service. Prerequisite: CUL 1102 Corequisite: CUL 1104

    CUL 1111 Introduction to Production Cookery

    2 credits

    This course introduces students to production cooking in a real-life restaurant setting. It is designed so the student can utilise all that they have learned in the preceding culinary courses with an emphasis on cleanliness, usage of ingredients, plate presentation, and effective execution of dishes at a service quality standard. Prerequisites: CUL 1102 and 1110 Corequisite: CUL 1104

    CUL 1112 Breakfast & Short Order Cookery

    1 credits

    This course introduces students to the preparation and presentation of a range of breakfast items; baked goods, egg, fish and meat dishes, teas, coffees and juices, preparation and presentation of fresh fruits. Students will practice short-order cooking using a variety of cooking methods. Prerequisite: CUL 1102 Corequisite: CUL 1104

    CUL 1114 Seafood Cookery

    2 credits

    This course will entail procuring, handling and preparation of shellfish used in professional kitchens. Product knowledge, proper handling and receiving, storing, sanitation, and nutrition will be emphasised. Prerequisites: CUL 1102 and 1110 Corequisite: CUL 1104

    CUL 1116 Introduction to the Larder (Garde Manger)

    2 credits

    This course introduces students to basic hot and cold hors d’oeuvres, dressings, various forcemeats, chaud-froid decorating and preparation and design of modern buffet presentations including fruit, vegetable, lard and ice carving. Prerequisite: CUL 1102 Corequisite: CUL 1104

    CUL 1117 Introduction to Baking and Pastry

    3 credits

    This course introduces students to the fundamental techniques and procedures used in baking and pastry production. Includes study of baking terminology, weighing procedures, ingredients and basic mixing methods to produce a variety of yeast breads, cakes, cookies, and desserts to industry standards. Prerequisite: CUL 1102 Corequisite: CUL 1104

    CUL 1119 Culinary Arts Internship

    3 credits

    This twelve week-internship focuses on skills in food production and service through rotation in the kitchen brigade stations including Garde Manger, Breakfast and Short Order, Bakery and Pastry, Saucier, Larder & Butchery and Entremetier. Prior to the internship, students will develop the skills and necessary documentation to prepare for the workplace. Prerequisites: A minimum GPA 2.0 or higher in all Culinary Arts programme courses required as pre-requisites; CUL 1104, CUL 1108, CUL 1109, CUL 1110, CUL 1112, CUL 1117

    CUL 1122 Introduction to Caribbean and Bermudian Cuisine

    2 credits

    Introduction to Bermudian and Caribbean Cuisine will expose the student to various commodities that are indigenous to Bermuda and the Caribbean region. This course begins by explaining the history and characteristics of these cuisines, followed by identifying the ingredients used in preparing traditional meat, seafood and vegetarian dishes. This course also covers the preparation of soups, sauces, breads, pastries, and even special Bermudian and Caribbean holiday dishes. Upon completion of this course, the student should understand the culture and common practices of cooking in Bermuda and the Caribbean. Prerequisites: A minimum GPA 2.0 or higher in all culinary arts programme courses required as a pre-requisite CUL 1102, CUL 1104, CUL 1108, CUL 1109, CUL 1110, CUL 1114 or previous experience approved by the faculty.

    CUL 1125 Introduction to Food & Beverage Service

    4 credits

    Through theoretical and practical applications, students are introduced to the front-of-the-house operations and professional dining room service techniques. Quality service, positive guest relations, and effective communication skills are emphasised. Students are prepared for certification through the Federation of Dining Room Professionals. Prerequisites: CUL 1102, CUL 1104 or previous experience approved by the faculty.

    CUL 1127 Oriental Cuisine

    2 credits

    The following skills are contained in this module: demonstrating knowledge of the history and characteristics of Chinese cuisine; identifying and preparing dishes from the four main regional Chinese cuisine: Cantonese, Hunan, Peking and Szechuan; using cutting methods associated with oriental cuisine; demonstrating stir-fry and steaming methods; demonstrating Oriental Rice cookery; preparing Japanese dishes; preparing dishes of Malaysia, Indonesia and Vietnam; preparing dishes of Singapore and Thailand. Prerequisites: CUL 1102, CUL 1104, CUL 1108, CUL 1109, CUL 1110, CUL 1114 or previous experience approved by the faculty.

    CUL 1128 International Cuisine

    3 credits

    This course focuses on the main regions of the world noted for regional cuisines including the South American continent, Europe, India, and the Oriental region. Emphasis is placed on identifying and using, ingredients, equipment and utensils, cutting and cooking techniques specific to the various world regions being studied. Prerequisites: CUL 1102, CUL 1104, CUL 1108, CUL 1109, CUL 1110, CUL 1114 or previous experience approved by the faculty.

    CUL 1129 Italian Cuisine

    2 credits

    The following skills are contained in this module: demonstrating knowledge of the history and development of Italian cuisine; preparing antipastos; preparing pasta dishes; preparing specialty soups and sauces; baking Italian breads and rolls; preparing Italian salads; preparing Italian desserts. Prerequisites: CUL 1102, CUL 1104, CUL 1108, CUL 1109, CUL 1110, CUL 1114 or previous experience approved by the faculty.

    CUL 1130 American Regional Cuisine

    2 credits

    The following skills are contained in this module: demonstrating knowledge of the history and characteristics of American Regional Cuisine; preparing dishes using regional game; preparing specialty desserts by American region; preparing vegetable dishes by region; preparing seafood dishes specific to American regions. Prerequisites: CUL 1102, CUL 1104, CUL 1108, CUL 1109, CUL 1110, CUL 1114 or previous experience approved by the faculty.

    CUL 1131 Nutrition

    2 credits

    An introduction to the functions of food sources of nutrients and their utilisation in human metabolic processes. Students will be required to list the primary functions and best sources of each of the major vitamins and minerals and evaluate diets in terms of the recommended dietary allowances.

    CUL 2118 Menu Planning

    3 credits

    This course introduces students to basic menu planning principles, menu terminology and description, food and liquor menu layout and design, menu pricing, mechanics and analysis, nutrition and health concerns, cost control, product mix, average check and impact on profit.

    CUL 2124 Techniques in Healthy Cooking

    2 credits

    This course will study healthy cooking techniques, nutritional guidelines in the selection and preparation of healthy food products including vegetarian and special diet meals. Prerequisites: CUL 1102, CUL 1104, CUL 1108, CUL 1109, CUL 1110, CUL 1114 or previous experience approved by the faculty.

    CUL 2127 Advanced Production Cookery and Innovative Techniques

    2 credits

    This module incorporates the skills students have developed in the programme and provides execution of food production at a more advanced level. Students will practice innovative culinary techniques and use specialty ingredients. Food techniques include spherification, emulsification, food deconstruction, and molecular gastronomy. Prerequisites: CUL 1104, CUL 1108, CUL 1109, CUL 1110

    CYS 1102 Foundations of Early Childhood Education

    3 credits

    This introductory course explores the historical, philosophical and social foundations of early childhood education. Theories, conceptual frameworks and supporting research in areas of child development and education are critically evaluated and their implications for practices are assessed. Students are encouraged to examine the forces that shape the future of early childhood education and the roles that the activities of teachers and caregivers play in that future. A minimum grade of B is required. Corequisite: A grade of C or better ENG 0012.

    CYS 1103 Introduction to Child Development

    3 credits

    A survey of the concepts, theories and various aspects of the development of children and adolescents. Topics include prenatal development, patterns of physical growth, sensation and perception, cognitive development, information processing, intelligence and assessment, language development and personality development. A minimum grade of B is required. Corequisite: ENG 1111.

    CYS 2201 Personal, Social-Emotional Development of Children & Adolescents

    3 credits

    An examination of the personal, social-emotional and personality development of children and adolescents. Prerequisites: CYS 1102 and CYS 1103.

    CYS 2204 Exceptional Children

    3 credits

    The course will provide an overview of special education in relation to the inclusion policy for public schools. The historical development of special education from Roman Civilisation to the 1900s will be addressed together with the various exceptionalities of children including etiologies prognosis and educational alternatives. The course includes discussions on the effect of socio-economic status, ethnic group affiliation and parental and community attitudes towards those with disabilities. The benefits of acknowledging and working with cultural diversity and its capacity to enrich and enhance curriculum will be examined. Prerequisite: CYS 1102.

    CYS 2205 Individual Differences in Learning

    3 credits

    Understanding of achievement as a function of the interactions between learner characteristics, task and environment. Learner characteristics will be examined in terms of modalities of learning, cognitive processing styles, language, memory, attention, culture and motivation. The nature of tasks will be examined in relation to match with learner characteristics; breakdown; error analysis; and the use of compensatory strategies. The environment will be viewed as existing beyond the immediate setting and extended to learners’ availability for learning. Discussion will focus on “the most facilitative environment” (particularly as it relates to inclusion) and adapting the environment to learner strengths and weaknesses. Prerequisite: CYS 1102.

    CYS 2251 Classroom Management

    3 credits

    Identification of the educator’s role in the behavioural, social/ecological, developmental, academic, biophysical and psychodynamic approaches to classroom management. The analysis and implementation of classroom management techniques, using least intrusive and appropriate interventions in order to facilitate instructional strategies and individual learning within the least restrictive environment, will constitute a major emphasis in the course. The significance of behaviour as a means of communication and the development of parental awareness and involvement are targeted as significant aspects in the prevention and reduction of inappropriate behaviours. Prerequisite: CYS 1102 or EDU 2201.

    CYS 2265 Early Childhood Education Experience

    6 credits

    A practical experience with children and/or youth to be conducted in a Bermuda College approved setting under the guidance of a professional. This practicum is undertaken on the approval of the programme advisor. Prerequisites: Minimum GPA 2.0 as well as a minimum of a B grade in CYS 1102 and CYS 1103; completion of CYS 2231, CYS 2251 and CYS 2204 or CYS 2205.

    ECM 1101 Introduction to E-Commerce

    3 credits

    This course allows students to better understand the opportunities created by e-commerce. Students will develop and implement winning strategies for today’s Internet economy. Students will also learn about hardware, software, telecommunications, products, etc.; components that make up a modern e-business. Prerequisite: ENG 0012

    ECM 1110 Generating Web Pages

    3 credits

    This course covers the universe of generating web pages and/or web sites using contemporary Internet programming commands. Students will learn to use basic (tables, links, images, etc.), intermediate (frames, forms, etc.), and advanced (style sheets, multimedia, etc.) commands and functions. Prerequisites: ENG 0012 and MAT 0015

    ECM 1180 E-Commerce Internship

    3 credits

    Work experience in a selected local business. The experience will be in e-commerce related area of a business or to assist a local charity in developing a website. The precise nature of the experience will be agreed upon after discussion between the college and management of the business. Prerequisites: A minimum GPA 2.0 or higher in all e-commerce programme courses necessary as prerequisites; ECM 1101, ECM 1110, MGN 1114, CIS 1120.

    ECO 1101 Principles of Micro-Economics

    3 credits

    An introduction to economic analysis covering the problems of scarcity and choice, the allocation of resources in market and collective economies, a detailed analysis of the price mechanism, business organisation and the theory of the firm. Corequisite: One mathematics course at 1100 level.

    ECO 1102 Principles of Macro-Economics

    3 credits

    An introduction to economic analysis covering national income theory, fiscal and monetary policy, international trade, inflation, unemployment and economic growth. Attention is focused on current economic issues facing the United States and Bermuda. Corequisite: One mathematics course at 1100 level.

    ECO 2201 Intermediate Micro-Economics

    3 credits

    A detailed study of theory concerning supply and demand, consumer demand, and theory of the firm. Prerequisite: ECO 1101.

    ECO 2202 Intermediate Macro-Economics

    3 credits

    A detailed study of national income theory, consumption, investment, international trade, economic growth, fiscal and monetary policy, and their relevance to current economic issues. Prerequisite: ECO 1102.

    ECO 2298 Selected Topics in Economics

    3 credits

    Designed to allow students an opportunity either for in-depth inquiry into a topic covered in another 2000-level course or for the study of a special topic or theme in economics. The course is offered periodically depending upon student interest. Prerequisite: Appropriate 1000-level courses and/or a 2000-level course relevant to the topic.

    EDU 2201 Foundations of Education

    3 credits

    A study of the historical, philosophical, and social foundations of education. Topics include: Educational reform movements; Teacher ethics, Multiculturalism; The contributions of local educators to the teaching profession. The course will provide an orientation to the teaching profession. Prerequisite: 18 credits in Liberal Arts courses.

    EDU 2202 Children and their Environment

    3 credits

    An examination of the environmental issues that shape the lives of children and their families. The course focuses on the experience of children in multicultural, multilingual, and multiracial families. The influence of communities and policies on family functioning is examined. Prerequisite: EDU 2201.

    EES 1101 Environmental Science

    4 credits

    An introduction to environmental interrelationships and ethics; interrelated scientific principles; ecosystems; communities and populations; energy sources; land-use planning; soils and agriculture; water management; pollution; waste management and hazardous materials regulation; environmental policy and decision making. Laboratory.

    EES 1102 The Atmosphere: Weather & Climate

    4 credits

    An introduction to the atmosphere and its interaction with the Earth’s surface and oceans - air composition; air pressure; cloud forms; precipitation types; wind, air masses; frontal systems; storms and ocean currents. Relationship of climates to weather patterns and topography. Use of weather instruments and maps. Practical and field activities.

    EES 1103 The Lithosphere: Cartography and Geomorphology

    4 credits

    An introduction to the surface features of the Earth; their formation and alteration; soil types; and the relationship of life forms to geographical features; the history of cartography; the development and production of thematic maps. Practical and field activities.

    EES 1105 The Hydrosphere: Oceanography and Limnology

    4 credits



    EES 2211 Environmental Geography

    3 credits

    A study of the environmental framework of the Earth; its ecosystems and bioclimatic, atmospheric, and hydrologic environments; pollution patterns, trends and impacts; hazardous waste production and disposal; biological diversity; land use; and environmental management. Prerequisites: 8 credits from EES 1101 - EES 1105 or BIO 1102 - BIO 1122.

    EES 2221 Human and Cultural Geography

    3 credits

    A study of population, language, religion, culture, agriculture, industry and politics; the impact of trade, transportation and communications on cities and countries; international relations, environmental problems and global social problems. Analysis of thematic and topographic maps. Prerequisites: 8 credits from EES 1101 - EES 1105 or SOC 1101and 1102.

    ELN 1101 How to Study This Course and Achieve Your Personal Goals

    1 credits

    The following topics are contained in this module: How to study this course and achieve your personal goals; The attributes of an IBEW/NECA apprenticeship; Knowing your apprenticeship and your responsibilities; The IBEW and its history; The structure of NECA and its heritage; Your job and the future it holds for you; Sexual harassment; Electrical safety.

    ELN 1102 Introduction to Test Instruments and Overcurrent Protection Devices

    1 credits

    The following topics are contained in this module: Identifying some basic tools of the trade; The workplace of an electrical worker; The proper care and use of ladders; The installation and use of fastening devices; Reality of electrical shock; Introduction to test instruments; Introduction to overcurrent protection devices; Understanding the design and function of ground fault interrupters.

    ELN 1103 Building Wire Construction and Insulation Properties

    1 credits

    The following topics are contained in this module: Learning to tie basic knots; Using hand signals; Hoisting loads properly; How wire connectors are made and installed; Building wire construction and insulation properties.

    ELN 1104 Conduit Fabrication - Theory and Practice

    1 credits

    The following topics are contained in this module: How building wire is sized; How to work with fractions; Review of basic trigonometric functions; How to fabricate ninety degree stubs, kicks and offsets in electrical conduit; How to fabricate 3 & 4 bend saddles in electrical conduit.

    ELN 1105 The Metric System and Metrication Changes

    1 credits

    The following topics are contained in this module: Working with aluminium conductors; Identifying commonly used electrical materials; Working with prefixes and powers of ten; The Metric System; How to solve basic algebraic equations; How to manually calculate square root.

    ELN 1106 Fundamentals of Blueprint Reading and Sketching

    1 credits

    The following topics are contained in this module: The fundamentals of blueprint drawing and sketching; Understanding architectural views and how to draw them; Understanding common scales used on blueprints; Working with blueprint specifications, elevations, and schedules; Understanding and drawing electrical and mechanical symbols used on blueprints; Reading and analysing a residential blueprint.

    ELN 2113 Testing and Measuring with the Analogue and Digital Multimeter

    1 credits

    This module introduces the student to test instruments. In addition, the student is given the training that will enable him or her to measure electrical properties safely and efficiently. Seven intense labs provide the necessary hands on training for this very important module. Topics include: Avoiding the hazards of drug abuse; The IBEW Constitution; Understanding your local union by-laws; Parliamentary procedure and how it works; Introduction to the Comet Programme; Getting acquainted with Electrical Test instruments; Understanding and Using Multimeters.

    ELN 2114 Developing NEC Code Book Skills

    1 credits

    This module continues to build and strengthen the student’s knowledge of the NEC and also requires the student to solve code related job problems in the classroom setting under the guidance of a Code Certified Instructor. Topics include: Developing code book skills; Development of the NEC: The table of contents; The arrangement, structure, and language of the NEC; Codeology fundamentals; NEC article 90 introduction; Applying the NEC’s "General Chapter" Included are twenty class participation workshops that enable the student to apply this knowledge to solving "on the job" problems.

    ELN 2115 Understanding the Design and Function of AC and DC Generators

    1 credits

    This module introduces the student to the oscilloscope and AC and DC generators. Topics include: Reviewing the applications of DC theory; Comparing direct current to alternating current; Using oscilloscopes to view AC waveforms; Testing and verifying circuit performance; An introduction to three phase systems; Circuit calculations for basic systems; Understanding how the DC generator works; understanding the design and function of AC generators; Becoming familiar with AC resistive circuits. Eleven labs are included which give the student the training, confidence and capability to safely test and measure various electrical quantities.

    ELN 2116 Laying-Out Residential Circuits and Basic Estimating

    1 credits

    This module builds on the introductory blueprint reading skills learned from year one. The following topics are contained in this module: Reviewing the basic fundamentals of blueprints; Analysing and laying out residential circuits; Understanding job costs and how to do an actual quantity takeoff; Understanding, interpreting and evaluating blueprint specifications; Interpreting blueprint schedules and locating components on the print; Becoming familiar with blueprint systems integration; Learning how to effectively use blueprints; Understanding and using ratchet type benders; The fundamentals of segment and concentric bending; Understanding how to install wire and cable.

    ELN 2117 AC Theory: Inductance How it Affects a Circuit

    1 credits

    This module introduces the student to Inductance and how it affects an AC circuit. It also lays the ground work for solving problems in AC circuits and the operation of transformers and other inductive devices. Topics include: Becoming familiar with inductive reactance; Frequency and inductive reactance; Inductors in series and parallel. Six labs allow the student to gain practical experience with series and parallel circuits.

    ELN 2118 AC Theory: Capacitance and How it Affects a Circuit

    1 credits

    This module introduces the student to the third quantity of an AC circuit-Capacitance. Topics include: How capacitance affects a circuit; Becoming familiar with capacitive reactance; Working safely with capacitors; Working with capacitors in series or parallel; Understanding vectors and how to use them effectively. Seven labs provide practical circuits for the student to analyse.

    ELN 2119 Working with Series and Parallel RL & RC Circuits

    1 credits

    This module introduces the student to series and parallel RL circuits and series and parallel RC circuits; Topics include: Understanding the basic characteristics of AC circuits; Comprehending the parameters of series RL circuits; Understanding and working with parallel RL circuits; Comprehending the parameters of series RC circuits; Understanding and working with parallel RC circuits. Fifteen lab assignments give the student a thorough knowledge of series and parallel RL and RC circuits.

    ELN 2120 Analysing and Working with Combination RLC Circuits

    1 credits

    This series of lessons provides the necessary information, along with twenty-one lab assignments, for the student to solve job problems for both series and parallel circuits containing resistance, inductance and capacitance. Topics include: Identifying and working with LC circuits; Comprehending and analysing series RLC circuits; Resonance in parallel circuits; Comparing series and parallel RLC circuits; Analysing and working with Combination RLC circuits; Series resonance; Parallel resonance; Clearly and accurately describe the characteristics of series and parallel resonant circuits.

    ELN 2121 Filters, Power Factor and Power Factor Correction

    1 credits

    This module introduces the student to the theory and operation of various types of filters and their application. In addition, the student will examine power factor and power factor correction. Topics include: An examination of the four classifications for filters; Power factor; Power factor correction. Six labs give the student the training and the confidence to solve problems involving filters and power factor on the job.

    ELN 2122 Understanding the Principles of Three Phase Systems

    1 credits

    This module introduces the student to the fundamental design and function of single and three phase transformers. Topics include: Understanding the fundamental design and function of transformers; Learning how to identify and make single-phase transformer connections; Proper transformer installation procedures; Understanding the principles of three-phase systems; Learning how to identify and connect three phase transformers. Six lab assignments give the student practical hands on experience with the various types of transformer connections used in industry.

    ELN 2123 NEC - Branch Circuits 1 & 2 and Feeders and Services

    1 credits

    This module allows the student to make use of Table 8 in chapter 9 of the NEC to investigate the properties of various conductor sizes. The student will use his/her knowledge of the NEC to work with branch circuits, services and feeders. Topics include: The principles involved in sizing building wire; Calculating conductor ampacity; Branch circuits 1 & 2; Outside branch circuits and feeders; Services 1; Lighting and receptacles.

    ELN 2124 NEC - Requirements for Cable Assemblies & Wiring Methods

    1 credits

    This module focuses on the various wiring methods recognised by the NEC. In addition, the student will become acquainted with many of the terms the NEC uses in conjunction with conduit wiring methods. Topics include: How to correctly apply the NEC’s conduit wiring methods; The NEC’s requirements for cable assemblies; Identifying boxes and fittings as defined by the NEC; Wiring methods - general installation requirements; Wiring methods - specific; Electrical non-metallic tubing (ENT)

    ELN 5149 Keys to Success-Motivation and Leadership

    1 credits

    This module will teach the student about his/her new and more important role as an electrical journeyman, as a potential instructor, as a role model for apprentices and as a responsible and productive member of society. Topics include: After apprenticeship; Soon to be an Instructor; Keys to success-motivation and leadership; The economics of unemployment.

    ELN 5150 Fire Alarm Systems

    1 credits

    This course has been developed to provide a high level of instruction to the Apprentice Level and Journeyman Level Installer. The student will learn the fundamentals of fire alarm systems; examine the basic signal types, circuit classes and styles and general principles of fire alarm signalling. Topics include: Introduction to fire alarm systems; Fundamentals of fire alarm systems; Initiating devices; Notification devices; Wiring and wiring methods; Inspection, Testing and maintenance; Interfaced systems; Supervising stations; NICET certification. Lab assignments give students the opportunity to work with the latest fire alarm equipment available to the job site.

    ELN 5151 Introduction to Instrumentation

    1 credits

    This module introduces the student to the fundamentals of instrumentation which is the first step in learning the measurement and controls fields. Topics include: Introduction to instrumentation-definitions; Introduction to instrumentation-fundamentals; Understanding instrument symbols; Fundamentals of instrument calibration; Understanding calibration procedures; Fundamentals of pressure; Fundamentals of flow.

    ELN 5152 Fundamentals of Controllers

    1 credits

    This course introduces the student to more advanced topics in Instrumentation. Topics include: The fundamentals of temperature; Pneumatics and control valves; Fundamentals of controllers; The smart instrument communicator; Fundamentals of smart instrument calibration; Fundamentals of instrument installation (Part 1) and (Part 2).

    ELN 5153 Security Systems & Telephone Wiring

    1 credits

    This module introduces the student to security systems. While there are a number of systems available, this course uses the Sentrol ZX400/ZX410 as its source of information. The student will learn that this particular system is very much like many others and much of the knowledge obtained studying the Sentrol Security System is applicable to other security types as well. In addition, the student will study Telephone Wiring. Topics include: Basic security system; Magnetic contacts; Passive infrared motion detectors; Glassbreak sensors; Basic telephone wiring; Safety codes; TIA/EIA Standards and codes; Structured cabling systems.

    ELN 5154 Structured Cabling Systems

    1 credits

    This module introduces the student to Structured Cabling Systems with special emphasis on TIA/EIA Standards. Topics include: Structured cabling system overview; Cabling system performance; Unshielded twisted pair cables; Unshielded twisted pair connecting hardware; Pathways and spaces; Telecommunications cabling administration; Telecommunications grounding and bonding; Residential telecommunications cabling.

    ELN 5155 Solar Power Generation and Fuel Cell Basics

    1 credits

    This course focuses on two very important alternative energy topics: Solar Power and Fuel Cell Technology. The student will study the provisions of NEC Article 690 and how they apply to Solar Photovoltaic energy systems and the Array Circuits. Topics include: NEC requirements for solar power generation; Information technology sites and critical loads; Uninterruptible power supplies; Infrastructure components; Critical UPS systems design configurations; Solar photovoltaic systems-recommended practices (1), (2) and (3); Fuel cell basics; Fuel cell applications (1) and (2).

    ELN 5156 High Voltage Testing

    1 credits

    This module introduces the student to high voltage testing. The student will learn what high voltage testing is and why it is used; list the types of high voltage tests and describe when they are used; describe the types of leakage currents that are present during these tests; describe the advantages of AC and DC testing; describe the different types of test instruments used in conducting high voltage tests. Topics include: Introduction to high voltage testing; High voltage testing safety; Preparing for high voltage testing; Insulation quality testing; Acceptance and maintenance testing; Insulation testing using the megohmmeter.

    ELN 5157 Harmonics and Power Quality Surveys

    1 credits

    This module introduces the student to Power Quality. The student will review the various systems that comprise a modern power distribution system. He/she will learn why Harmonics is considered to be one of the most significant power quality problems found in electrical distribution systems today. Topics include: Power distribution systems; Power quality terminology, Costs and concepts; Types of power problems; Harmonics; Power quality surveys; Power system troubleshooting; Mitigation equipment.

    ELN 5158 Automation Networks

    1 credits

    In this module the student will learn what automation networks are and how they are different from traditional wiring systems in buildings. In addition, the student will study about the advantages of a network infrastructure over dedicated wiring systems. Topics include: Introduction to automation networks; Automation network fundamentals; Installing building automation networks; Intelligent nodes and network devices; Integrating building automation networks.

    ELN 5159 Understanding Emergency Building Installation Requirements

    1 credits

    This module serves as a review of earlier lessons on NEC Article 230 services. In addition, it will cover items like GPPE for Services under 600 volts nominal or less and the installation requirements for services exceeding 600 volts nominal. The student will study NEC Article 725-remote control signalling and examine the significant change to the 2005 Code. Topics include: Installing electrical services; Pools, Fountains and similar locations; Understanding emergency building installation requirements; Over 600 volt installations; Remote control signalling and power limited circuits; NEC 2005 (1) & (2); Determining conductor ampacity.

    ELN 5160 Electrical Load Calculations as per the NEC

    1 credits

    This final Code lesson concentrates on various load calculations for single and multifamily residential units. Topics include: Calculating raceway fill; Box size and fill calculations; Introduction to load calculations; Calculating range loads as per the NEC; Calculating residential loads as per the NEC; Calculating multifamily dwelling loads as per the NEC.

    ENG 1044 Communications for Industry I

    3 credits

    A course emphasising communication skills for industry, including reading and comprehension of printed material used in industry, interpreting graphs and charts, writing short reports, instructions and memos, and giving a short presentation. Students receive reinforcement in the practices of standard written English. Prerequisite: ENG 0002 with a grade of C or better or CPT scores in reading comprehension and sentence skills of 60 or higher. This course is a certificate course and will not normally transfer into degree programmes.

    ENG 1045 Communications for Industry II

    3 credits

    A course emphasising comprehension and summary of industry-related material, writing researched reports, preparing short talks, and developing different styles of letters and memos commonly required in industry. Prerequisite: ENG 1044 with a grade of C or better or CPT scores in reading comprehension and sentence skills of 80 or higher. This course is a certificate course and will not normally transfer into degree programmes.

    ENG 1111 Freshmen English

    3 credits

    A course in essay writing that emphasises persuasive writing in a variety of expository forms, such as cause-effect, process analysis and division-classification. Students develop research and documentation skills and apply them to required research papers. Prerequisite: A grade of C or better in ENG 0012 and a grade of C or better in ENG 0016.

    ENG 1112 Literary Analysis

    3 credits

    An introduction to literary analysis that focuses on devices such as imagery, setting, character, point of view, theme, and figures of speech in selected works of prose, poetry, drama and short fiction. Students read works from different perspectives and prepare analytical and researched essays. Prerequisite: ENG 1111.

    ENG 1115 Writing for the Workplace

    3 credits

    A writing course designed for students who wish to develop the organisational techniques, style, and research skills appropriate to business and industry. Analysis will be emphasised. A researched business report is required. Prerequisite: ENG 1111.

    ENG 2203 Survey of English Literature I

    3 credits

    A critical and appreciative study of major British authors and types of literature including poetry, prose and drama from the Anglo-Saxon period to the eighteenth century. The works studied may vary year to year, but the course will look at works by the Beowulf poet, Chaucer, Shakespeare, Donne, Milton, Swift and Fielding. There will be some attention given to the historical context. Prerequisite: ENG 1112 or permission of the lecturer.

    ENG 2204 Survey of English Literature II

    3 credits

    A critical and appreciative study of major British authors and types of literature including poetry, prose and drama from the Romantic period to the present. The works studied may vary from year to year. There will be some attention given to the historical context. Prerequisite: ENG 1112.

    ENG 2212 Oral Communication

    3 credits

    A study of the theory and practice of public speaking. Levels of communication and their application. The focus is on preparing and delivering oral presentations. Prerequisite: ENG 1112 or ENG 1115.

    ENG 2239 Women Writers

    3 credits

    A selected study of novels, short stories, drama and poetry, written by women from the mid-19th Century to the present. Works by representative authors from the United States, the Caribbean, Africa, Asia and Bermuda. Prerequisite: ENG 1112.

    FAB 1100 Food Service I

    4 credits

    Practical food, beverage and wine service skills and knowledge in a dining room, principles of merchandising and salesmanship, customer relations, forecasting and planning workloads and bar technology. Students are required to obtain the Federation of Dining Room Professionals Certified Dining Room Associate and the Associate Wine Steward certification.

    FLM 1101 Introduction to Film Studies

    3 credits

    This course teaches the fundamental concepts and critical skills involved in interpreting film. Students shall participate in discussing and viewing films and clips; in addition, they are required to produce a series of critical essays and a film project.

    FLM 2201 Intermediate Film Studies

    3 credits

    This course concentrates on the artistic and social aspects of films and filmmaking. Classic, contemporary and international films are considered within aesthetic and historical perspectives. Students shall participate in discussions and view films and clips; in addition, they will produce a series of critical responses and a film project. Prerequisites: FLM 1101, ENG at the 1000-level or by permission of the instructor.

    HIS 1140 World History I

    3 credits

    A survey of world history from the spread of Islam to the era of European global expansion. The course uses primary and secondary material in an attempt to understand the social, political, intellectual and cultural development of civilisations around the world. Corequisite: ENG 1111 is required.

    HIS 1141 World History II

    3 credits

    This course analyses the development and interaction of world civilisations from the spread of Christianity to the First World War. Topics include the Scientific and Industrial Revolutions, colonialism and imperialism. Coverage also includes development in the Americas, the Caribbean and Bermuda. Corequisite: ENG 1111 is required.

    HMT 1120 Introduction to Lodging Management

    3 credits

    A study of hotel organisation with particular reference to skills required for lodging management. Topics include: Reservations, Reception; Cashiering; Night Audit; Housekeeping. Practical experience will be gained in a weekly two-hour lab.

    HMT 1155 Introduction to the Hospitality Industry

    3 credits

    This course is designed to provide an overview, and a fundamental understanding of the basic principles, practices and concepts of the hospitality industry

    HMT 1175 Hospitality Management Internship

    3 credits



    HMT 1265 Hospitality Sales and Marketing

    3 credits

    A broad perspective of hospitality marketing, placing emphasis on the analysis, structure, and strategy of the hospitality marketing department, allocation of resources, marketing research, and the effectiveness of the marketing plan. It will also take an in-depth study into the promotional tool of personal selling, target marketing, product positioning, with an emphasis on identifying and meeting the sales needs of the customer. Prerequisite: At least 18 credits in the Associate in Hospitality Management.

    HMT 2255 Hospitality Supervisory Practices

    3 credits

    A study of the theory and practices relating to supervision within the hospitality industry including recruitment, motivation, discipline, communications, conflict resolution, effective change. Prerequisite: At least 18 credits in the Associate in Hospitality Management.

    HMT 2260 Food and Beverage Management

    3 credits

    A study of the art and science of managing a profitable food and beverage operation. Management structure and functions, Food and beverage cost controls, Prevention of theft and fraud, and The management of small business operations will be covered. Prerequisite: FAB 1100.

    HVA 1101 Fundamentals of Heating and Cooling

    5 credits

    The following skills are contained in this module: Describe basic principles of HVAC; Complete basic trade calculations; Use Ohm’s Law to analyse electrical circuits; Analyse the refrigeration cycle; Describe operation of furnaces.

    HVA 1102 Mechanical Maintenance

    3 credits

    The following topics are contained in this module: Analyse air properties; Select and install venting systems; Maintain mechanical components; Test AC circuits and components.

    HVA 1103 HVAC Controls

    3 credits

    The following topics are contained in this module: Test electronic circuits; Test electric furnace controls; Operate electric, electronic and pneumatic control systems; Identify accessories; Install and adjust refrigerant controls.

    HVA 1104 Refrigeration System Service

    4 credits

    The following topics are contained in this module that will help students: Operate, service and install compressors; Service heat pumps; Use leak detectors, vacuum pumps, recovery units and charging systems; Recycle refrigerants. During this module students will write the Ministry of Environment Certification exam for CFC Handling in Bermuda.

    HVA 1105 Senior Student Project I

    2 credits

    This module will consist of a hands-on project in the workshop to develop students’ practical application of theory learned in the first two semesters of the programme. The project will vary each year according to grants received from ASHRAE. Requirements include a progress report to be sent to ASHRAE at the end of the semester.

    HVA 1106 Troubleshooting Heating

    3 credits

    The following topics are contained in this module: Perform preventive maintenance; Apply troubleshooting techniques; Troubleshoot electronic controls, gas, oil and electric heating systems.

    HVA 2107 Troubleshooting Cooling

    3 credits

    The following topics are contained in this module: Troubleshoot cooling equipment, heat pumps and accessories.

    HVA 2108 Hydronics

    2 credits

    The following topics are contained in this module: Service commercial hydronic systems; Balance air and water systems; Maintain steam systems.

    HVA 2109 Senior Student Project II

    2 credits

    This is a continuation of Module 5. Requirements include a final report to be sent to ASHRAE at the completion of the project.

    HVA 2110 System Performance

    3 credits

    The following topics are contained in this module: Use blueprints; Test indoor air quality; Identify energy conservation equipment.

    HVA 2111 Energy Management

    3 credits

    The following topics are contained in this module: Explain energy management; Maintain water quality; Start-up and shutdown commercial systems.

    HVA 2112 System Design

    3 credits

    The following topics are contained in this module: Calculate heat loads; Identify cold storage equipment.

    INS 1101 Introduction to Risk and Insurance

    3 credits

    Key concepts and legal principles in risk management and insurance are taught. Government regulations and the social and economic significance of the insurance industry are also explored.

    INS 2201 Property and Casualty Insurance

    3 credits

    Examines personal and commercial property and liability risks, crime insurance and surety bonds, along with the interpretation of insurance contracts. Prerequisite: INS 1101.

    LAW 2203 Business Law

    3 credits

    This course gives students a working knowledge of the legal system and the law and how it affects day-to-day operations of business. Emphasis is on the Law of Contract, the Law of Torts and Employment Law. Prerequisite: 18 credits at the 1000-level.

    MAT 1034 Business Mathematics

    3 credits

    Topics include bank services, payroll calculations, mathematics of buying and selling, simple and compound interest, business and consumer loans, depreciation. Prerequisite: A grade of C or better in MAT 0010 or satisfactory performance on College Placement Test. This course is a certificate course and will not normally transfer into degree programmes.

    MAT 1105 College Algebra I

    3 credits

    Intended to provide exposure to a number of mathematical topics at college level for those students who do not wish a concentration in mathematics but who need to improve their competency in intermediate algebra. Such topics will include a review of intermediate algebra, including absolute value, domain and range of functions, symmetry, graphs of polynomials and other functions. Prerequisite: A grade of C or better in MAT 0015 or satisfactory performance on College Placement Test. Successor: MAT 1141, MAT 1151.

    MAT 1107 A Survey of Mathematics

    3 credits

    An introductory course in mathematics covering topics in set theory, Venn Diagrams, logic, consumer mathematics, as well as other selected topics including, but not limited to, finite mathematical systems and graph theory. Prerequisite: A grade of C or better in MAT 0015 or satisfactory performance on College Placement Test.

    MAT 1131 Finite Mathematics

    3 credits

    Intended for business students needing to develop a facility with certain techniques to solve practical problems. Includes systems of linear equations and inequalities, optimisation, supply and demand analysis, linear programming, mix of constraints, matrix algebra, sinking funds, amortisation, future value of ordinary annuities. Prerequisite: A grade of C or better in MAT 0015 or satisfactory performance on College Placement Test. Successor: MAT 1132.

    MAT 1132 Business Calculus

    3 credits

    Intended for business students using calculus as a tool with particular applications in management and economics. includes exponential and logarithmic functions, elementary differential calculus, applications to maxima and minima, cost analysis, marginal propensity to consume and the multiplier, integral calculus, area between two curves, simple differential equations, optimisation of profit. Prerequisite: MAT 1131.

    MAT 1141 Pre-Calculus

    3 credits

    A continuation of the study of topics in algebra, in addition to topics in trigonometry recommended for students of calculus, or those seeking a concentration in mathematics or science. Includes the study of roots of polynomial equations, the Remainder Theorem, exponential and logarithmic functions and equations, graphs of trigonometric functions, trigonometric equations, compound angles, sine and cosine formulae. Prerequisite: MAT 1105 or satisfactory performance on College Placement Test. Successor: MAT 1152.

    MAT 1152 Calculus I

    3 credits

    Intended as a theoretically-rich advanced approach to the fundamental concepts of calculus, particularly useful for students wishing to pursue further university level work in this or related fields. Includes limits, continuity, differentiability, Rolle’s Theorem, the Mean Value Theorem, Riemann sums, Fundamental Theorem of Calculus. Prerequisite: MAT 1141. Successor: MAT 2201.

    MAT 2201 Calculus II

    3 credits

    Intended as a continuation of MAT 1152 for students taking a concentration in science and/or mathematics. Includes inverse trigonometric and hyperbolic functions, techniques of integration, indeterminate forms, tests for convergence of series, Taylor series. Prerequisite: MAT 1152. Successor: MAT 2220.

    MAT 2210 Linear Algebra

    3 credits

    Intended to provide a comprehensive understanding of the theory and applications of matrices, particularly for the aspiring scientist and mathematician. Includes systems of linear equations, vector spaces, Gram-Schmidt process, linear transformations, matrices, determinants, eigenvalues and eigenvectors, real quadratic forms. Prerequisites: MAT 1141 and MAT 1152.

    MAT 2220 Multivariable Calculus

    3 credits

    Intended as a continuation of MAT 2201 for students taking a concentration in science and/or mathematics. Includes quadric surfaces, limits, continuity and differentiability of functions of several variables, directional derivatives, Lagrange multipliers, line integrals, double and triple integration, surface areas. Prerequisite: MAT 2201. Recommended Preparation: MAT 2210.

    MAT 2233 Statistics I

    3 credits

    Intended for students requiring a background in descriptive statistics and elementary sampling theory. Includes characteristics of frequency distributions, measures of central location and variability, probability and probability distributions, sampling theory and sampling distributions. Applications are taken from business, management, social science and science. Prerequisite: 15 credits at the 1100-level, three of which must be an 1100-level math course. Successor: MAT 2234.

    MAT 2234 Statistics II

    3 credits

    A continuation of MAT 2233 covering methods of statistical inference. Includes estimation, hypothesis testing, chi square, and analysis of variance, linear regression and correlation. Applications are taken from business, management, social science and natural science. Prerequisite: MAT 2233.

    MAT 2240 Elementary Differential Equations

    3 credits

    Intended to provide exposure to the topics in the differential equations for the students who wish to obtain a concentration in mathematics or in the fields of science where a sound background in mathematics is required. Such topics include first order differential equations and their applications in biology, chemistry and social science, second order differential equations and their applications in mechanics and electronics, higher order equations, series solutions and matrix methods. Prerequisite: MAT 1152.

    MGN 1015 Accounting in Action

    3 credits

    This course will draw upon the knowledge and skills students have acquired throughout the Accounting Assistants programme. The use of practical accounting-oriented mini-case studies and simulations will aid in the development of students’ problem-solving and decision-making skills. Students will be required to present their decisions in writing and through oral presentations and discussions. Prerequisite: CIS 1120. Corequisite: ACC 1042.

    MGN 1016 Accounting Assistant Work Placement

    1 credits

    This course requires the student to demonstrate professional ethics, skills and knowledge required of an accounting assistant in the office environment. This course is a final course preparing the student for immediate employment. Prerequisite: A minimum GPA 2.0 or higher in all Accounting Assistant programme courses required as prerequisite; ACC 1041, CIS 1120, Corequisite: MGN 1015, OFA 1040, OFA 1025 and ACC 1042.

    MGN 1017 Foundations of Business

    3 credits

    This course introduces students to business by defining what a business is and examining the environment in which today’s businesses exist. It defines the role of manager, examines the organisation of the business into functions and describes the responsibilities of each main function. This course is a certificate course and will not normally transfer into degree programmes.

    MGN 1114 Introduction to Business

    3 credits

    This course provides an introduction to business concepts and functions. Topics covered include: ethics and social responsibility, forms of business ownership, small business and entrepreneurship, management and organisation of the firm, marketing, operations, finance, and human resources. Emphasis will be placed upon the discussion of current issues and trends relating to these topics. Case study analysis will be introduced. Prerequisite: ENG 0012.

    MGN 1116 Tourism

    3 credits

    An introduction to tourism, including tourism supply components, marketing and the social and economic impact of tourism development both internationally and in Bermuda.

    MGN 1129 Customer Service Skills

    3 credits

    This course will provide students with a systematic process for developing customer service skills that are required to deliver “service excellence;” a term used to describe the exceptional levels of service that customers seek. In addition to learning about what makes up the twenty first century “service economy,” students will have an opportunity to develop “service excellence” strategies that they can apply in their future careers. Emphasis will be placed learning how to become obsessed with satisfying customer needs, effectively dealing with difficult customers, consistently communicating with customers, building lasting relationships with customers and embracing emerging service oriented technologies designed to foster brand loyalty. Prerequisite: A grade of C or better in ENG 0012 or satisfactory performance on the College Placement Test.

    MGN 2110 Introduction to Human Resource Management

    3 credits

    This course will expose students to the diverse area of human resource management and the theory and practice in areas such as recruitment and selection of staff, training and development and performance appraisal. Relevant legislation, current and future trends will also be explored. Prerequisites: MGN 1114 and ENG 1111.

    MGN 2119 Business Work Placement

    3 credits

    An academic practicum designed to provide an opportunity to apply knowledge gained in the classroom to a work environment. The practicum is a minimum of eighty hours of unpaid work experience. Prerequisites: A minimum GPA 2.0 or higher in all Business Management programme courses required as prerequisite; ACC 1140 or CIS 1130 as well as ACC 1135, ACC 1145, CIS 1120, CSC 1100 and MGN 1114 or permission from the Practicum Coordinator.

    MGN 2210 Marketing Management I

    3 credits

    An introduction to marketing that examines the marketing concept, the consumer, marketing opportunities, target marketing and the four components of the marketing mix, i.e. price, product, place and promotion. Prerequisite: MGN 1114.

    MGN 2211 Marketing Management II

    3 credits

    A continuation of MGN 2210 that looks at consumer buying behaviour, retailing, wholesaling, selling, price setting, product life cycle, market research and international marketing. Prerequisite: MGN 2210.

    MGN 2217 Business Analysis and Communication

    3 credits

    This course reinforces the theoretical principles of business introduced in MGN 1114 through communication skills development. It will require students to make practical use of introductory business concepts. Students will be required to research and analyse business-related material and express their ideas in the form of oral presentations, formal reports and case studies. Prerequisites: CIS 1120 and MGN 1114.

    MGN 2222 Organisational Behaviour

    3 credits

    This course examines the behaviour of individuals and groups in organisations. Topics include: Perception; Motivation; Rewards; Managing inter-group conflict; Managerial functions; Power; Leadership styles and managing change. Prerequisite: MGN 1114.

    MGN 2230 Introduction to Project Management

    3 credits

    Project Management is becoming increasingly more important in today’s world. Mastery of key tools and concepts provides a significant competitive advantage in the marketplace. This course content deals with setting the scope of the project, planning, staffing, organising, directing, controlling and closing projects. The course includes major topics such as strategy, priorities, organisation, project tools and leadership. Primary class emphasis is on the project management process and tools. Prerequisite: CIS 1120.

    MGN 2240 Finance I

    3 credits

    The course provides an in-depth study of the techniques required for managerial decision-making in the financial area. Topics include: Mathematics of finance; Financial analysis; Financial management; Interest rate theories; Working capital management; Short-term financing and capital markets. Prerequisites: ACC 1145 and MAT 1131.

    MGN 2241 Finance II

    3 credits

    A continuation of MGN 2240. Topics include: Present values; Cost of capital; Managing risk; Long-term financing; Dividend policies; Calculating bond and stock values. Prerequisite: MGN 2240.

    MGN 2245 Introduction to Small Business Management

    3 credits

    This course introduces the student to interrelated operations of a small business. The content covers the essentials of starting a small business from the generation of the idea through the completion of the business plan, as well as the practical aspects of the day to day operation. Prerequisite: MGN 1114.

    MGN 2250 Introduction to International Business

    3 credits

    An introduction to the world of international business and Bermuda’s role in the global economy. The course will raise students’ levels of awareness and understanding of the way business is conducted worldwide. Topics such as the Role of International Business in Bermuda’s economy; Cross-cultural Communication and Management; International Marketing and Finance; and the Structure of the Multinational Organisation will be covered. Prerequisite: MGN 1114.

    MSC 1103 Music Appreciation

    3 credits

    A historical survey of the development of western music and its composers from the medieval period to jazz. Emphasis is placed on how the elements of music change and develop throughout history. This course involves extensive listening and live concert attendance.

    MSC 1204 Piano Skills I

    3 credits

    Group instruction and performance in the beginning level of piano skills and musicianship.

    MSC 2298 Special Themes and Topics in Music

    3 credits

    This course uses a wide variety of musical genres, including classical, reggae and hip hop to explore music as a cultural expression of life and society. It uses music to explore topics such as cultural diversity, social justice, and cultural appropriation. The course also uses Beyoncé's Lemonade to deconstruct the topics of African spirituality, womanism and relationships. Prerequisite: Appropriate 1000-level courses and/or a 2000-level course relevant to the topic.

    MVT 1101 Ignition Systems

    2 credits

    The following topics are contained in this module: Identify the basic ignition systems; Identify different distributor systems; Performing basic engine and ignition tests.

    MVT 1102 Fuel/Exhaust Systems

    2 credits

    The following topics are contained in this module: Identify the various types of fuels and fuel specifications; Testing and servicing the components of fuel systems; Air intake systems components and replace exhaust systems.

    MVT 1103 Exhaust Emissions Systems

    2 credits

    The following topics are contained in this module: Perform diagnostic testing and repair problems related to the positive crankcase ventilation system; Describe the operation of gas exhaust systems and catalytic converters; Perform test and repair components of spark control and idle speed control systems.

    MVT 1104 Electrical Systems

    3 credits

    The following topics are contained in this module: Testing and diagnosing of electrical systems; Identifying electrical principles; Diagnosing and testing electrical circuits.

    MVT 1105 Battery/Charging Systems

    3 credits

    The following topics are contained in this module: Perform diagnosis and service of batteries; Testing charging systems.

    MVT 1106 Starting Systems

    3 credits

    The following topics are contained in this module: Identify starter systems; Inspect testing and disassemble of starter systems; Perform repairs on starter systems.

    MVT 2107 Braking Systems

    1 credits

    The following topics are contained in this module: Perform diagnostic tests on braking systems; Investigate the operation of disc and drum brake systems.

    MVT 2108 Hydraulic Brake Systems

    1 credits

    The following topics are contained in this module: Perform repairs on hydraulic brake systems; Adjust hydraulic brake systems.

    MVT 2109 Anti-Lock Brake Systems

    1 credits

    The following topics are contained in this module: Perform diagnostic test and repairs on power assisted and antilock brake systems; Service antilock brake systems

    MVT 2110 Steering Systems

    1 credits

    The following topics are contained in this module: Identify steering systems; Diagnose, Test and repair steering systems.

    MVT 2111 Power Steering Systems

    1 credits

    The following topics are contained in this module: Perform test and service manual and power steering; Service power steering pump; Perform inspection on and repair of steering column.

    MVT 2112 Suspension Systems

    1 credits

    The following topics are contained in this module: Diagnose wheel alignment; Adjust and repair wheel alignments and perform wheel balance and implement the principles of the front and rear suspension systems.

    NCC 1101 Basic Safety

    1 credits

    Complies with OSHA-10 training requirements. Explains the safety obligations of workers, supervisors, and managers to ensure a safe workplace. Discusses the causes and results of accidents and the impact of accident costs. Reviews the role of company policies and OSHA regulations. Introduces common job-site hazards and identifies proper protections. Defines safe work procedures, proper use of personal protective equipment, and working with hazardous chemicals. Identifies other potential construction hazards, including hazardous material exposures, welding and cutting hazards, and confined spaces.

    NCC 1102 Mathematics

    1 credits

    Reviews basic mathematical functions such as adding, subtracting, dividing, and multiplying whole numbers, fractions and decimals, and explains their applications to the construction trades. Explains how to use and read various length measurement tools, including standard and metric rulers and tape measures, and the architect’s and engineer’s scales. Explains decimal-fraction conversions and the metric system, using practical examples. Also reviews basic geometry as applied to common shapes and forms.

    NCC 1103 Hand Tools

    1 credits

    Introduces trainees to hand tools that are widely used in the construction industry, such as hammers, saws, levels, pullers, and clamps. Explains the specific applications of each tool and shows how to use them properly. Also discusses important safety and maintenance issues related to hand tools.

    NCC 1104 Power Tools

    1 credits

    Provides detail descriptions of commonly used power tools, such as drills, saws, grinders, and sanders. Reviews applications, proper use, safety, and maintenance. Many illustrations show power tools used in on-the-job settings.

    NCC 1105 Introduction to Construction Drawings

    1 credits

    Familiarises trainees with basic terms for construction drawings, components, and symbols. Explains the different types of drawings (civil, architectural, structural, mechanical, plumbing/piping, electrical, and fire protection) and instructs trainees on how to interpret and use drawing dimensions. Four oversized drawings are included.

    NCC 1107 Basic Communication Skills

    1 credits

    Provides trainees with techniques for communicating effectively with co-workers and supervisors. Includes practical examples that emphasise the importance of verbal and written information and instructions on the job. Also discusses effective telephone and e-mail communication skills.

    NCC 1108 Employability Skills

    1 credits

    Identifies the roles of individuals and companies in the construction industry. Introduces trainees to critical thinking and problem solving skills and computer systems and their industry applications. Also reviews effective relationship skills, effective self-presentation and key workplace issues such as sexual harassment, stress and substance abuse.

    NCC 1109 Introduction to Material Handling

    1 credits

    Recognises hazards associated with materials handling and explains proper materials handling techniques and procedures. Also introduces materials handling equipment and identifies appropriate equipment for common job-site tasks.

    NCC 1110 Introduction to Construction Technology and Trades/Technical Job Skills

    5 credits

    This course will provide students with an appreciation for modern technology, trades and engineering. Topics covered will be basic safety, hand and power tools, employability skills, and materials handling. Also an introduction to technical skills required for the various technical occupations/trades with an introduction to plumbing, HVAC, automotive and electrical systems.

    NUR 1150 Nursing Fundamentals

    8 credits

    Students in Nursing 1150 will acquire fundamental psychomotor, critical thinking and communication skills through student participation in classroom, skills lab, and clinical activities. Students learn basic assessment skills and nursing procedures utilizing values and ethics necessary for practice focusing on gerontological nursing care.

    NUR 2200 Psychiatric Nursing

    4 credits

    This course introduces concepts of nursing care for patients throughout the life span with maladaptive psychosocial and physiological responses related to mental disorders. Development of communication skills, self awareness and the therapeutic use of self in selected clinical settings is integrated throughout the course.

    NUR 2201 Medical Surgical Nursing

    4 credits

    Students in Nursing 2201 will learn nursing care of individuals with common disease processes. The clinical experience allows students to further develop psychomotor skills such as health assessment and use critical thinking and communication skills to develop a nursing diagnosis on a stable medical or surgical patient.

    NUR 2210 Maternal Child Health Nursing

    4 credits

    This course continues the synthesis and refinement of the nursing process in the provision of contemporary maternity nursing care. Application and analysis of the therapeutic management of complex health issues are applied to clients across the lifespan, specifically childbearing families pre- and post-delivery. A focus is on family education, cultural competency and sensitivity to values and ethical concerns of the childbearing family.

    NUR 2230 Paediatrics

    4 credits

    This is a portion of the capstone course of the entry level nursing program. Students are introduced to the health care of the paediatric population, with increased focus on family-centred care across the lifespan. In the clinical setting, students demonstrate an ability to apply the nursing process to the care of individuals and families. Skill development reflects those psychomotor skills necessary for technical nursing care and skills necessary for critical thinking, therapeutic communication and teaching/learning, with an introduction to leadership skills. In this course, students are introduced to the practice of nursing in the home and community based settings. At the completion of this course, students are poised to become caring and reflective members of the profession of nursing.

    NUR 2250 Adult Health

    4 credits

    This course focuses on the etiologic, symptomatologic and pathologic aspects of selected human diseases across the life span. Concepts of health promotion, disease prevention, disease progression, and treatment are approached from a cellular and multisystem perspective. Influences of genetic, ethnic, and cultural variables on human diseases is analysed. Application and analysis of the therapeutic management of complex health issues are applied to clients across the lifespan. A focus is on family education, cultural competency and sensitivity to values and ethical concerns. 2 credit hours of classroom and 2 credit hours of clinical (90 hours of clinical per semester).

    NUR 2251 Adult Health Practicum

    4 credits

    This is the capstone course of the ADN, entry level nursing program. Students in this course examine health issues that are complex and encompass multiple systems. Information presented will be synthesized with knowledge gained in previous courses, specifically pathophysiology, pharmacology and medical surgical nursing. In the clinical setting, students will demonstrate the ability to apply the nursing process to the care of individuals with complex needs. Current Evidenced based research and implications will be incorporated throughout.

    OFA 1040 Communication and Presentation Skills

    2 credits

    This course provides training in oral and written communication skills necessary in the workplace. Presentation software will be utilised. Prerequisite: Basic computer skills. This course is a certificate course and will not normally transfer into degree programmes.

    OFA 1060 Office Applications Certification

    1 credits

    This course requires independent study and practice to successfully complete at least four applications to include as a minimum word processing, spreadsheet, presentation software, web browsing and communication. Either the International Computer Drivers Licence (ICDL) or the Microsoft Office Specialist (MOS) certifications will be considered acceptable. Prerequisite: CIS 1120. This course is a certificate course and will not normally transfer into degree programmes.

    OFA 1090 Office Work Placement

    3 credits

    This course requires the student to demonstrate professional ethics, skills and knowledge required of an office assistant in the office environment. This course is a final course preparing the student for immediate employment. Prerequisite: A minimum GPA 2.0 or higher in all Office Assistant programme courses required as prerequisite, CIS 1120, OFA 1011, OFA 1025 Corequisite: OFA 1040. This course is a certificate course and will not normally transfer into degree programmes.

    PED 1102 Basketball

    1 credits

    Designed to develop students in this activity. Emphasis will be placed on continued skill development, knowledge of rules, strategies and principles of the game.

    PED 1103 Badminton

    1 credits

    Designed for a wide range of students. This course will introduce students to basic skills, knowledge of rules and principles of the game.

    PED 1104 Soccer

    1 credits

    Designed to further the development of soccer skills. Emphasis will be placed on continuous skill development, knowledge of rules, strategies and principles of the game.

    PED 1107 Zumba

    1 credits

    Zumba is a specialised aerobics activity using a blend of Latin dances and international music to create an exhilarating, effective, easy-to-follow, calorie-burning fitness programme.

    PED 1108 Body Combat

    1 credits

    This PED session will offer 30 minutes of self-defence where students learn to master a variety of martial arts moves from the disciplines of Taekwondo, Karate, Kickboxing, Muay Thai, and Jiu-Jitsu. In the second half of the class students will apply and perform these moves in Les Mills Body Combat routines, a non-contact, high intense cardio workout to the latest hard-hitting tunes.

    PED 1110 Archery

    1 credits

    Designed to develop students in this activity. Emphasis will be placed on continuous skill development (Static/Dynamic Stages), knowledge of rules, safety, technique, optimum practice conditions and equipment maintenance.

    PED 1111 Weight Training

    1 credits

    Emphasis will be placed on knowledge, principles, technique, optimum practice conditions, physical conditioning, proper use of equipment/facility, and equipment maintenance.

    PED 1113 Table Tennis

    1 credits



    PED 1119 Volleyball

    1 credits

    This course will enable students to acquire basic principles of the game so they can participate successfully in recreational games.

    PED 1121 Body Pump

    1 credits

    This course will enable students to engage in group fitness that will allow them to shape, tone, and strengthen their entire body.

    PHL 1104 Introduction to Philosophy: Ethics and the Nature of Man

    3 credits

    This course addresses the questions, What is Human?, How does humanity differ from other animals?, Are we truly free?, What are our responsibilities and ethical obligations, or Where do these obligations come from? Answers to these questions are pursued through a historical and contemporary study of Ethics, Identity, the Mind-Body Problem, or Free Will and Determinism.

    PHY 1121 Principles of Physics I

    4 credits

    A course in fundamental principles and applications of physics, introducing the basic concepts and principles of mechanics and thermodynamics. Topics include: Equations of motion; Newton’s Laws of motion; Transnational and rotational equilibrium; Work; Energy; Momentum; Heat, Kinetic gas theory; The gas laws. Suitable for students intending to pursue other scientific studies or wishing to specialise in physics and its related technologies. Laboratory. Prerequisite: C grade in PHY 0013, or alternatives in Physics and Mathematics. Corequisite: MAT 1141.

    PHY 1122 Principles of Physics II

    4 credits

    A continuation of PHY 1121. Topics include: Vibration and waves; Sound; Electricity and magnetism; Light and optics and Modern physics. Laboratory. Prerequisite: PHY 1121.

    PLM 1101 Introduction to the Plumbing Profession, Safety and Tools

    4 credits

    This module reviews the basic plumbing tools used to measure, lay out, cut, drill, bore, and ream. Trainees will learn how to safely use, properly care for, and maintain plumbing tools.

    PLM 1102 Plastic pipe, Copper, Cast Iron, Steel Pipe and Fittings

    2 credits

    Introduces trainees to the different types of plastic pipe and fittings used in plumbing applications, including ABS,PVC, CPVC.

    PLM 1103 Fixtures and Faucets, Drain, Waste and Vent systems

    2 credits

    Explains how DWV systems remove waste safely and effectively. Discusses how system components, such as pipe, drains, traps and vents work.

    PLM 2107 Sizing Water Supply Piping, Potable Water Treatment

    3 credits

    Explains how to disinfect, filter, and soften water supply systems. Discusses how to troubleshoot water supply problems, flush out visible contaminants from a plumbing system, and disinfect a potable water plumbing system.

    PLM 2108 Backflow Preventers, Types of Venting, Sizing DWV Systems

    4 credits

    Reviews the different types of vents that can be installed in a DWV System and how they work. Also teaches design and installation techniques.

    PLM 2109 Sewage Pumps, Compressed Air

    2 credits

    Explains the installation, diagnosis, and repair of pumps and controls in a water system.

    PSY 2220 Abnormal Psychology

    3 credits

    An evaluation of abnormal behaviour, including the core concepts of the differing psychopathology: neuroses, psychoses and social disorders. Different approaches to treatment are described. Prerequisites: PSY 1101 and PSY 1102.

    PSY 1101 Introduction to Psychology I

    3 credits

    A survey of the conceptual approaches in psychology: biological bases of behaviour, perception, consciousness (sleep, dreams, hypnosis, meditation), learning, language, basic drives (hunger, thirst, sex), motivation, emotion and intelligence. Prerequisite: ENG 0012 with a grade of C or higher.

    PSY 1102 Introduction to Psychology II

    3 credits

    A survey of the basic areas of specialty and practice within the field of psychology, including human sexuality, problem solving, social psychology, human development, personality, abnormal behaviour and clinical practice. Prerequisite: PSY 1101.

    PSY 2210 Introduction to Social Psychology

    3 credits

    An examination of human behaviour covering such topics as conformity, altruism, impression formation, aggression, prejudice, love and attraction attitudes, and organisational behaviour. Emphasis is placed on understanding the connection between sociological and psychological determinants of normal and abnormal behaviour. Prerequisites: PSY 1101 and PSY 1102.

    PSY 2240 Human Development

    3 credits

    An analysis of the principles of human development from conception to death. Basic biological processes that shape development including conception and heredity are described. The development of the infant as a social, cognitive and physical being is traced through childhood, adolescence and into adulthood and older adulthood. Prerequisites: PSY 1101 and PSY 1102.

    PSY 2270 Learning Theory

    3 credits

    An examination of developmental issues influencing learning, including cognitive, personal, moral, physiological, and neuro-physiological. Specific learning theories covered include classical and operant conditioning, cognitive theories, and social learning theories. Prerequisites: PSY 1101 and PSY 1102.

    PSY 2272 Educational Psychology

    3 credits

    The application of both learning and educational psychology theories to teaching strategies, classroom organisation and curriculum design. Instructional planning, teaching styles and classroom dynamics are also examined. Prerequisite: PSY 2270.

    REL 1101 Introduction to Religious Studies I

    3 credits

    A comparative study of primitive religions, Hinduism, Buddhism, Chinese and Japanese religions.

    REL 1102 Introduction to Religious Studies II

    3 credits

    A comparative study of Judaism, Christianity and Islam. Prerequisite: REL 1101 is highly recommended.

    RSO 1203 Photography

    1 credits

    Is there a prize winning photographer within you? Learn how to take fantastic photos and have the opportunity to host and exhibit on campus.

    RSO 1206 Bermuda College Literary Society

    1 credits

    If you have been inspired by great writers and poets, this is for you. Whether you enjoy creating or critiquing, this organisation will allow you to explore your talents and interests.

    RSO 1209 Hospitality Club

    1 credits

    This club strives to promote and perform quality service in Bermuda by networking with local and international organisations in the hospitality industry.

    RSO 1213 Modern Dance

    1 credits



    RSO 1219 Bermuda College Radio

    1 credits

    Live 4.0 is an online radio station designed to provide a source of quality radio programming for the BC Community. This is an opportunity to DJ and produce live talk shows and commercials.

    RSO 1221 Volunteer Action

    1 credits

    Students can volunteer their time at local organisations and receive credit. A total of 14 hours must be completed before credit can be given.

    RSO 1222 MENSPEAK (Male Forum)

    1 credits

    Participants can expect to engage in open dialogue about issues that affect males. Participants will organise and take part in activities that raise awareness of key issues and contribute to their own and other's personal development.

    RSO 1227 Bermuda College Art Gallery (BCAG) Club

    1 credits

    An opportunity to create and submit artwork that will be displayed in the BC Art Gallery. Available only to Art and Design students.

    RSO 1228 Bermuda College Environmental Club

    1 credits

    Think Green! This is your opportunity to become more environmentally aware and active. We will look at the application of environmental concepts and develop activities to promote environmental awareness on campus and in the community.

    RSO 1231 "Cura Te Ipsum" (Heal Thyself)

    1 credits

    Explores holistic alternatives for healthy living and much more.

    RSO 1232 Teachers of Tomorrow

    1 credits



    RSO 1235 Tech Maker Faire Club

    1 credits

    Are you a maker or an inventor? Do you have ideas to build something? Participants will work together to brainstorm ideas for a technology project and work as a team to bring their ideas to reality.

    SOC 1101 Introduction to Sociology

    3 credits

    An introduction to the study of human society from the sociological perspective. Emphasises the nature and meaning of society, culture, status and role, socialisation and personality, deviance, and social stratification. Prerequisite: ENG 0012 with a grade of C or higher.

    SOC 1102 Introduction to Sociology II

    3 credits

    An introduction to the study of human society from the sociological perspective. Emphasises the nature and meaning of social institutions (the family, religion, education, and economy and politics), formal and informal organisations, and social change. Prerequisite: ENG 0012 with a grade of C or higher. SOC 1101 is strongly recommended.

    SOC 2220 Social Inequality

    3 credits

    An examination of the origins and nature of the principal types of social inequality including sex, caste, class and race. Deals particularly with studies of status in modern industrial societies and in Bermudian society. Prerequisites: SOC 1101 and SOC 1102.

    SOC 2251 Sociology of Marriage and Family

    3 credits

    A sociological study of marriage and family life: Demographic trends in marriage; Child bearing; Divorce; Theories of mate selection; Marital interaction and marital dissolution; Relationship of unmarried couples; Alternative marriage forms; Abortions; Violence in the family. Prerequisite: SOC 1101, SOC 1102 or PSY 1102.

    SOC 2280 Sociology of Deviant Behaviour

    3 credits

    An examination of the nature of deviance and its sociological explanations through analysis of selected topics such as mental illness, violence, sexual deviance and drug abuse. Also examined are social responses to deviance including stigmatisation, treatment and social control. Prerequisites: SOC 1101 and 1102.

    SOC 2290 Sociology of Crime and Delinquency

    3 credits

    An historical overview of criminological theory presenting biological, psychological, sociological, cultural, political and biosocial theories of the causes of crime and delinquency. Deviance theory, social disorganisation, labelling and delinquency sub-cultural analysis are examined and the works of major theorists are critically explored. Prerequisites: SOC 1101 and SOC 1102.

    SOW 1151 Introduction to Social Work

    3 credits

    Designed for students wishing to explore interest in and capacity providing a comprehensive overview of the ways that Social Workers respond to a wide range of societal problems, as well as the agencies that administer the services to those in need, this course emphasizes your own interests and abilities in relation to Social Work values, your capacity to interact in a caring and non-judgmental manner with others who have diverse lifestyles and different socio-economic backgrounds, and your ability to critically examine major social problems and issues. Prerequisites ENG 0012 with a grade of C or higher.

    SPA 1101 Beginners Spanish I

    3 credits

    This course is a foundational course designed for students who have little or no Spanish-speaking skills previously, for students who have minimal knowledge of basic concepts of the language, or for students who have formerly studied Spanish, but who have a three-year or more gap in their schooling experience, or for those who desire a basic refresher course and re-introduction to the Spanish language. Course content will include vocabulary building, reading, speaking, writing with an emphasis on building basic writing skills and audio-lingual development.

    SPA 1102 Beginners Spanish II

    3 credits

    This course is a continuation of Beginners Spanish 1 (SPA 1101). It is designed for students who have had at least two years of Spanish at the secondary school level without any gaps in their Spanish educational experience, or for students who are competent in the basic linguistic skills and who can minimally converse in Spanish, but who desire increased competency in the fundamentals of the language. The course is designed to build on the basics of the language and aims to increase audio-lingual development through vocabulary building, reading, speaking, and writing to prepare students for the intermediate level. Prerequisite: SPA 1101 or permission of the lecturer.

    SPA 2201 Intermediate Spanish I

    3 credits

    This course focuses on intermediate-level Spanish and is designed for students who have studied Spanish for a minimum of three years at the senior school level or for students who have a command of the basics of the language and who desire to strengthen their reading, writing and audio lingual skills. Students will learn more complex verb forms and idiomatic expressions to develop greater linguistic fluency and will strengthen their skills through the study of authentic text. Prerequisite: SPA 1102, or at least three (3) consecutive years in senior school Spanish or permission from the lecturer.

    SPA 2202 Intermediate Spanish II

    3 credits

    This course is a continuation of SPA 2201 and is designed for students who have strong audio lingual and written competencies and wish to strengthen their linguistic skills. Increased attention will be placed on reading, writing and oral communication. Students will have greater cultural exposure and will continue to develop proficiency and fluency. Prerequisite: SPA 2201 or permission from the lecturer.

    SSC 2200 Research Methods in the Social Science I

    3 credits

    An introduction to scientific methods as they are applied to the social sciences. The research process, including formulation of research problems and hypotheses; selection of appropriate research designs and instruments; developing questionnaires; interviewing; and observation techniques are presented and discussed. Prerequisite: 6 credits in approved 1000-level courses in Social Sciences.

    TEC 1000 Introduction to Computer Aided Technical Drawing

    3 credits

    An introduction to computer aided drafting software applications, two dimensional and three dimensional drafting design techniques, using CAD software for creating designing and printing, various designs, shapes, parts and functional objects.

    TEC 1004 Introduction to Electricity and Electronics

    3 credits

    This course will provide students with a practical overview of electrical and electronic systems and its use in modern technology, some of the topics to be covered are direct current systems, alternating current systems, semiconductors and digital systems.

    TMM 1001 Technical Math

    3 credits

    This course will provide students with a practical application of mathematical skills as it relates to technology. Some of the topics to be studied are a review of basic math skills, measurements and units, algebra essentials, Cartesian coordinates, systems of equations, plane and solid geometry, trigonometry, vectors, binary and hexadecimal numbers, and Boolean algebra.

    TSM 1101 Technical Science I

    4 credits

    This module is an introduction to applied science skills for the technical trades. It applies the principles of: Basic botany; Force and motion; Simple machines; Thermodynamics and electricity and magnetism.

    TSM 1102 Technical Science II

    4 credits

    The following skills are contained in this module: Coplanar forces; Distance; Time; Velocity and acceleration; Mechanical energy and power; Heat and temperature. Prerequisite: TSM 1101 with a minimum grade of C.