ACC AHS ALH ART ASC BIO CHM CIS CKN CSC CSM CUL ECM ECO EDU EES ELN ENG FAB FLM FREHIS HMT HVA INS LAW MAT MGN MSC MVT NCC NUR OFA PHL PHY PLM PSY REL RSO SOC SOW SPA SSC TEC TMM TSM WLD WTC



ACC 1041 Practical Accounting Procedures I

3 credits

This course is designed as an introduction to analysis, classification, and recording of business transactions in a manual environment with emphasis on the complete accounting cycle for a service business. Includes preparation of financial statements and bank reconciliations. This course is a certificate course and will not normally transfer into degree programmes.

ACC 1135 Accounting I

3 credits

An introduction to the basic theory and applications of contemporary financial accounting, including recording of transactions, measurement of income and the preparation of financial statements. Prerequisite: MAT 0015 or ACC1041 or equivalent.

ACC 1145 Accounting II

3 credits

An introduction to managerial accounting. Topics include bonds and long-term notes payable, investments, cash flows, analysis of financial statements, cost accounting, cost-volume-profit analysis, budgeting and managerial decision-making. Prerequisite: ACC 1135.

AHS 1126 Introduction to Art History I

3 credits

An historical survey of the development of western art and architecture from the earliest times to the Renaissance. Corequisite: ENG 1111

AHS 2280 Nineteenth Century Art

3 credits

A study of European art, 1800 to 1855, including painting, sculpture, architecture and decorative arts from the Neo-Classical and Romantic periods to the height of the Victorian era. Primary topics and artists: Delacroix and romanticism in France; Turner and British romantic landscape painting; the pre-Raphaelites, Courbet and the French realist, Goya. Prerequisites: AHS 1126 and AHS 1127.

ART 1101 Introductory Drawing

3 credits

A foundation course in drawing. Focuses on the development of the student’s awareness of line, tone, proportion, spatial relationships and rhythm. Subject matter will include still life, man-made and natural objects, landscape and non-figurative themes.

ART 1120 Two-dimensional Design

3 credits

A theoretical and practical exploration of the principles of two-dimensional design (line, shape, form, and composition) along with the investigation of various materials and tools, including the computer, so as to establish a framework in which students can solve various design problems.

ART 1135 Introduction to Colour and Composition

3 credits

A theoretical and practical study of colour and composition in art and in nature.

ART 2221 Intermediate Sculpture

3 credits

A continuation of ART 1221 Introductory Sculpture with opportunity for more individual expression and refinement while focusing on contemporary sculpting practices (fabrication, installation art, public art, performance art, etc.) along with the investigation of various materials and tools, including the computer, so as to establish a framework in which students can solve various design problems. Prerequisite: ART 1221 Introductory Sculpture or permission of the lecturer

ART 2230 Intermediate Painting

3 credits

A more detailed study in painting, using acrylics, oils, or watercolour to explore inherent qualities in each medium. Emphasis will be placed on tone, colour and composition. Prerequisite: ART 1102.

ART 2250 Introduction to Graphic Design

3 credits

Introduction to graphic design with emphasis on layout and design, colour in graphics, typography, the printing process and the application of the computer to these processes. Prerequisite: ART 1120 and 1135

BIO 1102 Introduction to the Life Sciences

4 credits

The focus initially is on methodology and major concepts in the life sciences. Elementary studies at the cell level for animals and plants will involve some related basic chemistry and physics. Laboratory techniques will be developed. This survey course is appropriate for those students who do not plan to specialise in the biological sciences. (It is also appropriate for mature students or persons with post-secondary or broad general experience but without formal science preparation). Prerequisite: A grade of C or better in BIO 0013.

BIO 1121 Principles of Biology I

4 credits



BIO 1122 Principles of Biology II

4 credits

Continuation of BIO 1121. This course will further explore variation and biological continuity through genetics, development and ecology as well as provide an introduction to basic physiological systems. Laboratory. Prerequisite: BIO 1121

BIO 2211 Anatomy and Physiology I

4 credits

Exploration of the intricate functions of the human body with emphasis on the physiological functions of the integumentary, skeletal, muscular, nervous and the endocrine systems. Integration of the human body will be studied as a whole focusing on the major theme of homeostasis. Laboratory. Prerequisite: BIO 1122

BIO 2212 Anatomy and Physiology II

4 credits

A continuation of Anatomy and Physiology I, with emphasis on the cardiovascular system, the lymphatic system and immunity, the respiratory system, the digestive system and metabolism, the urinary system, fluid/electrolyte and acid/base balance, and the reproductive systems. Integration of the human body will be studied as a whole focusing on the major theme of homeostasis. Case study investigations will be explored. Laboratory. Prerequisite: BIO 2211

BIO 2222 Medical Microbiology

4 credits

A course designed for students intending to pursue further studies in the biological sciences. This course is structured to provide a comprehensive introduction to medical microbiology. The aim is to foster in-depth knowledge of infectious microorganisms, their biochemistry and how they infect the organ systems of the human body. Basic microbiological principles with a focus on taxonomy, cell morphology and human pathologies caused by microorganisms. Prerequisite: BIO 1122

BIO 2250 Medical Nutrition

4 credits



CHM 1111 Principles of Chemistry I

4 credits

A survey of fundamental principles of physical chemistry including atomic structure, chemical bonding, molecular structure and gas laws. Laboratory. Prerequisites: A grade of C or better in CHM 0013 and MAT 0015, or alternatives in Chemistry and Mathematics. Corequisite Required: MAT 1105

CHM 2256 Organic Chemistry I

4 credits

A broad introduction to the behaviour of aliphatic and aromatic carbon compounds, including hydrocarbons, alcohols, aldehydes and ketones, stereo-isomerism, optical activity and spectroscopy. Laboratory. Prerequisite: CHM 1112

CIS 1120 Introduction to Business Applications of Computers

3 credits

Intended to provide students with an initial exposure to the main areas of software used in business: word processing, spreadsheets and presentation software. Additionally, an introduction to database management will be provided. A consideration of business application software in the context of the overall computer system will also be covered to include an overview of computer design, networking, operating systems and hardware options. This course is also suitable for those students studying programmes in social sciences or science.

CIS 1125 Introduction to Computers and Information Technology

3 credits

This entry-level survey course explores computers and their applications. Students are provided with an appreciation of what computers are, how they work and what tasks can be accomplished using them. Topics include the impact of computers on society; computer hardware including CPU, disks, other storage devices and input and output devices; computer software including data representation, data structures, operating systems, application programmes and database management systems; introduction to programming and programming languages; computer communications including the Internet, the world-wide web and e-mail; a brief history of computing; computer security, privacy and ethics. The coursework will cover the material needed for students to take the CompTIA IT Fundamental Certification. The coursework will cover the material needed for students to take the CompTIA IT Fundamental Certification.

CIS 1155 Programming for Information Systems I

3 credits

This course is an introduction to the basic principles of computer programming. It focuses on developing problem solving skills through writing programmes in Visual Basic. Students learn to develop graphical user interfaces (GUI’s) and use basic programming language structures to develop algorithms for solving various kinds of problems. The coursework will cover the material needed for students to take the Oracle Java Programmer Certification OCA or OCP.

CIS 2231 System Analysis and Design

3 credits

Intended to provide an understanding of the scope and nature of information systems, techniques applied to systems analysis and design and of the development life-cycle of a computer system project. Topics include the need for information and management systems, the human aspects of system development, fact-finding and structured systems analysis, design for real-time and distributed systems, computer hardware and software acquisition, system implementation techniques, and case studies. Prerequisite: CIS 1125 Corequisites CIS 1130 and ENG 0012 and MAT 0015.

CIS 2290 Networking Technologies

3 credits

This course covers the technology underlying data-communications systems such as transmission media, modulation and demodulation, multiplexing, packet switching, hardware, software and network operations. Topics include fibre optics, the Integrated Services Digital Network (ISDN), T-1 and T-3 multiplex, the open system interconnection (OSI) model, and integrated voice-data equipment. The coursework will cover the material needed for students to take the CompTIA Network+ Certification. Prerequisite: CIS 2278.

CKN 1102 Kitchen Theory and Practice 1

4 credits

Cuisine and related theory in preparation for hospitality management. Topics include preparation, cooking, presentation, and sanitation management.

CSC 1110 Learning Strategies for Student Success

1 credits

This course is designed to help students improve their college readiness; enhance their college experience; and improve learning skills. Students will master strategies and practical skills that will enable them to learn effectively. Topics include but are not limited to campus resources, time management, emotional intelligence, learning styles, reading strategies, library research, note-taking and study techniques. This course is intended to be completed in the first semester of the student.

CSM 1101 Computer Skills Module

2 credits

This course is designed to introduce the student to basic computer software applications in Microsoft Word, Excel and PowerPoint.

CUL 1020 English for Culinary Arts

3 credits

The following skills are contained in this module: reviewing of basic English skills; reading and understanding charts and instructions; writing reports, requisitions, orders, invoices, menus, rosters, function sheets/requisitions; writing a resume’ and a cover letter; developing interviewing and speaking skills. This course is a certificate course and will not normally transfer into degree programmes.

CUL 1102 Introduction to Culinary Arts

1 credits

This course introduces students to the history of culinary arts. Students will study kitchen equipment, organisation, chef’s tools, terminology, sanitation and conform to the industry standard of personal grooming, hygiene and professional presentation. Students must complete first aid and fire safety training.

CUL 1104 Sanitation & Safety

2 credits

An introduction to the fundamentals of food and environmental sanitation. The student will examine the origins of food-borne illness, prevention measures and the implementation of proper sanitation practices. The ServSafe certification test will be offered upon completion of this course.

CUL 1105 Meat Identification & Fabrication

2 credits

Students will identify and fabricate basic meats including primal, sub-primal cuts and kitchen ready cuts, identify USDA inspection stamps, government yield and quality grades for all carcasses. Students will practice methods of tenderizing, marinating and cooking techniques for all specific cuts including offal, game and poultry. Prerequisite: CUL 1102 Corequisite: CUL 1104

CUL 1106 Purchasing & Product Identification

3 credits

Students will learn methods for controlling costs as they apply to the selection and procurement of food, beverages, equipment, contract services and supplies with primary focus on product identification, supplier selection, ordering, receiving, storing and issuing process. This course prepares students to write an internationally recognised test.

CUL 1108 Introduction to the Preparation of Stocks, Soups & Sauces

2 credits

This course introduces classical production methods for the basic stocks used in the production of most soups and sauces. This includes production of the Grand Sauces and various derivatives, basic clear, cream, puree and international soups, as well as emulsified sauces. Prerequisite: CUL 1102 Corequisite: CUL 1104

CUL 1109 Introduction to Vegetable & Starch Cookery

2 credits

This course introduces students to classification, storage and preparation of the fundamental vegetables and provides the basics of preparing potatoes, starches, legumes and pastas including international starch dishes. Students will learn proper knife cuts and shaping of vegetables. Prerequisite: CUL 1102 Corequisite: CUL 1104

CUL 1110 Introduction to Cooking Methods

2 credits

The course introduces students to the vast variety of cooking methods, and the various types of heat transfer, including both moist and dry heat. The proper choice of ingredients associated with each cooking method, and the correct choice of tools and equipment will be discussed. Careful attention is placed on the proper application of technique throughout each step from preparation to service. Prerequisite: CUL 1102 Corequisite: CUL 1104

CUL 1122 Introduction to Caribbean and Bermudian Cuisine

2 credits

Introduction to Bermudian and Caribbean Cuisine will expose the student to various commodities that are indigenous to Bermuda and the Caribbean region. This course begins by explaining the history and characteristics of these cuisines, followed by identifying the ingredients used in preparing traditional meat, seafood and vegetarian dishes. This course also covers the preparation of soups, sauces, breads, pastries, and even special Bermudian and Caribbean holiday dishes. Upon completion of this course, the student should understand the culture and common practices of cooking in Bermuda and the Caribbean. Prerequisites: A minimum GPA 2.0 or higher in all culinary arts programme courses required as a pre-requisite CUL 1102, CUL 1104, CUL 1108, CUL 1109, CUL 1110, CUL 1114 or previous experience approved by the faculty.

CUL 1125 Introduction to Food & Beverage Service

4 credits

Through theoretical and practical applications, students are introduced to the front-of-the-house operations and professional dining room service techniques. Quality service, positive guest relations, and effective communication skills are emphasised. Students are prepared for certification through the Federation of Dining Room Professionals. Prerequisites: CUL 1102, CUL 1104 or previous experience approved by the faculty.

CUL 1128 International Cuisine

3 credits

This course focuses on the main regions of the world noted for regional cuisines including the South American continent, Europe, India, and the Oriental region. Emphasis is placed on identifying and using, ingredients, equipment and utensils, cutting and cooking techniques specific to the various world regions being studied. Prerequisites: CUL 1102, CUL 1104, CUL 1108, CUL 1109, CUL 1110, CUL 1114 or previous experience approved by the faculty.

CUL 1130 American Regional Cuisine

2 credits

The following skills are contained in this module: demonstrating knowledge of the history and characteristics of American Regional Cuisine; preparing dishes using regional game; preparing specialty desserts by American region; preparing vegetable dishes by region; preparing seafood dishes specific to American regions. Prerequisites: CUL 1102, CUL 1104, CUL 1108, CUL 1109, CUL 1110, CUL 1114 or previous experience approved by the faculty.

CUL 2124 Techniques in Healthy Cooking

2 credits

This course will study healthy cooking techniques, nutritional guidelines in the selection and preparation of healthy food products including vegetarian and special diet meals. Prerequisites: CUL 1102, CUL 1104, CUL 1108, CUL 1109, CUL 1110, CUL 1114 or previous experience approved by the faculty.

ECM 1110 Generating Web Pages

3 credits

This course covers the universe of generating web pages and/or web sites using contemporary Internet programming commands. Students will learn to use basic (tables, links, images, etc.), intermediate (frames, forms, etc.), and advanced (style sheets, multimedia, etc.) commands and functions. Prerequisites: ENG 0012 and MAT 0015

ECO 1101 Principles of Micro-Economics

3 credits

An introduction to economic analysis covering the problems of scarcity and choice, the allocation of resources in market and collective economies, a detailed analysis of the price mechanism, business organisation and the theory of the firm. Corequisite: One mathematics course at 1100 level.

ECO 1102 Principles of Macro-Economics

3 credits

An introduction to economic analysis covering national income theory, fiscal and monetary policy, international trade, inflation, unemployment and economic growth. Attention is focused on current economic issues facing the United States and Bermuda. Corequisite: One mathematics course at 1100 level.

ECO 2201 Intermediate Micro-Economics

3 credits

A detailed study of theory concerning supply and demand, consumer demand, and theory of the firm. Prerequisite: ECO 1101.

EDU 1102 Foundations of Early Childhood Education

3 credits

This introductory course explores the historical, philosophical and social foundations of early childhood education. Theories, conceptual frameworks and supporting research in areas of child development and education are critically evaluated and their implications for practices are assessed. Students are encouraged to examine the forces that shape the future of early childhood education and the roles that the activities of teachers and caregivers play in that future. A minimum grade of B is required. Corequisite: A grade of C or better ENG 0012.

EDU 2201 Foundations of Education

3 credits

A study of the historical, philosophical, and social foundations of education. Topics include: Educational reform movements; Teacher ethics, Multiculturalism; The contributions of local educators to the teaching profession. The course will provide an orientation to the teaching profession. Prerequisite: 18 credits in Liberal Arts courses.

EDU 2205 Individual Differences in Learning

3 credits

Understanding of achievement as a function of the interactions between learner characteristics, task and environment. Learner characteristics will be examined in terms of modalities of learning, cognitive processing styles, language, memory, attention, culture and motivation. The nature of tasks will be examined in relation to match with learner characteristics; breakdown; error analysis; and the use of compensatory strategies. The environment will be viewed as existing beyond the immediate setting and extended to learners’ availability for learning. Discussion will focus on “the most facilitative environment” (particularly as it relates to inclusion) and adapting the environment to learner strengths and weaknesses. Prerequisite: CYS 1102.

EDU 2206 Personal, Social-Emotional Development of Children & Adolescents

3 credits

An examination of the personal, social-emotional and personality development of children and adolescents. Prerequisites: CYS 1102 and CYS 1103.

EDU 2207 Methods & Instructional Techniques in Early Childhood Education

3 credits



EDU 2251 Classroom Management

3 credits

Exposes students to a range of evidence based classroom management strategies and techniques for prevention and intervention of inappropriate behaviours. Course content will explore the theoretical assumptions of various models and, through active learning, explore practical application of their strategies. While many approaches will be studied, the major emphasis in the course will be on creating safe, respectful and culturally reflective learning environments through developmental, academic and constructivist approaches.

EDU 2265 Early Childhood Education Experience

6 credits

A practical experience with children and/or youth to be conducted in a Bermuda College approved setting under the guidance of a professional. This practicum is undertaken on the approval of the programme advisor. Prerequisites: Minimum GPA 2.0 and the completion of EDU 2231, EDU 2251 and EDU 2204 or EDU 2205.

EES 1101 Environmental Science

4 credits

An introduction to environmental interrelationships and ethics; interrelated scientific principles; ecosystems; communities and populations; energy sources; land-use planning; soils and agriculture; water management; pollution; waste management and hazardous materials regulation; environmental policy and decision making. Laboratory.

EES 1102 Climate and Our Future

4 credits

An introduction to the atmosphere and its interaction with the Earth’s surface and oceans - air composition; air pressure; cloud forms; precipitation types; wind, air masses; frontal systems; storms and ocean currents. Relationship of climates to weather patterns and topography. Use of weather instruments and maps. Practical and field activities.

EES 2221 Human and Cultural Geography

3 credits

A study of population, language, religion, culture, agriculture, industry and politics; the impact of trade, transportation and communications on cities and countries; international relations, environmental problems and global social problems. Analysis of thematic and topographic maps. Prerequisites: 8 credits from EES 1101 - EES 1105 or SOC 1101and 1102.

ELN 1101 How to Study This Course and Achieve Your Personal Goals

1 credits

The following topics are contained in this module: How to study this course and achieve your personal goals; The attributes of an IBEW/NECA apprenticeship; Knowing your apprenticeship and your responsibilities; The IBEW and its history; The structure of NECA and its heritage; Your job and the future it holds for you; Sexual harassment; Electrical safety.

ELN 1102 Introduction to Test Instruments and Overcurrent Protection Devices

1 credits

The following topics are contained in this module: Identifying some basic tools of the trade; The workplace of an electrical worker; The proper care and use of ladders; The installation and use of fastening devices; Reality of electrical shock; Introduction to test instruments; Introduction to overcurrent protection devices; Understanding the design and function of ground fault interrupters.

ELN 1103 Building Wire Construction and Insulation Properties

1 credits

The following topics are contained in this module: Learning to tie basic knots; Using hand signals; Hoisting loads properly; How wire connectors are made and installed; Building wire construction and insulation properties.

ELN 1104 Conduit Fabrication - Theory and Practice

1 credits

The following topics are contained in this module: How building wire is sized; How to work with fractions; Review of basic trigonometric functions; How to fabricate ninety degree stubs, kicks and offsets in electrical conduit; How to fabricate 3 & 4 bend saddles in electrical conduit.

ELN 1105 The Metric System and Metrication Changes

1 credits

The following topics are contained in this module: Working with aluminium conductors; Identifying commonly used electrical materials; Working with prefixes and powers of ten; The Metric System; How to solve basic algebraic equations; How to manually calculate square root.

ELN 1106 Fundamentals of Blueprint Reading and Sketching

1 credits

The following topics are contained in this module: The fundamentals of blueprint drawing and sketching; Understanding architectural views and how to draw them; Understanding common scales used on blueprints; Working with blueprint specifications, elevations, and schedules; Understanding and drawing electrical and mechanical symbols used on blueprints; Reading and analysing a residential blueprint.

ELN 2113 Testing and Measuring with the Analogue and Digital Multimeter

1 credits

This module introduces the student to test instruments. In addition, the student is given the training that will enable him or her to measure electrical properties safely and efficiently. Seven intense labs provide the necessary hands on training for this very important module. Topics include: Avoiding the hazards of drug abuse; The IBEW Constitution; Understanding your local union by-laws; Parliamentary procedure and how it works; Introduction to the Comet Programme; Getting acquainted with Electrical Test instruments; Understanding and Using Multimeters.

ELN 2114 Developing NEC Code Book Skills

1 credits

This module continues to build and strengthen the student’s knowledge of the NEC and also requires the student to solve code related job problems in the classroom setting under the guidance of a Code Certified Instructor. Topics include: Developing code book skills; Development of the NEC: The table of contents; The arrangement, structure, and language of the NEC; Codeology fundamentals; NEC article 90 introduction; Applying the NEC’s "General Chapter" Included are twenty class participation workshops that enable the student to apply this knowledge to solving "on the job" problems.

ELN 2115 Understanding the Design and Function of AC and DC Generators

1 credits

This module introduces the student to the oscilloscope and AC and DC generators. Topics include: Reviewing the applications of DC theory; Comparing direct current to alternating current; Using oscilloscopes to view AC waveforms; Testing and verifying circuit performance; An introduction to three phase systems; Circuit calculations for basic systems; Understanding how the DC generator works; understanding the design and function of AC generators; Becoming familiar with AC resistive circuits. Eleven labs are included which give the student the training, confidence and capability to safely test and measure various electrical quantities.

ELN 2116 Laying-Out Residential Circuits and Basic Estimating

1 credits

This module builds on the introductory blueprint reading skills learned from year one. The following topics are contained in this module: Reviewing the basic fundamentals of blueprints; Analysing and laying out residential circuits; Understanding job costs and how to do an actual quantity takeoff; Understanding, interpreting and evaluating blueprint specifications; Interpreting blueprint schedules and locating components on the print; Becoming familiar with blueprint systems integration; Learning how to effectively use blueprints; Understanding and using ratchet type benders; The fundamentals of segment and concentric bending; Understanding how to install wire and cable.

ELN 2117 AC Theory: Inductance and How it Affects a Circuit

1 credits

This module introduces the student to Inductance and how it affects an AC circuit. It also lays the ground work for solving problems in AC circuits and the operation of transformers and other inductive devices. Topics include: Becoming familiar with inductive reactance; Frequency and inductive reactance; Inductors in series and parallel. Six labs allow the student to gain practical experience with series and parallel circuits.

ELN 2118 AC Theory: Capacitance and How it Affects a Circuit

1 credits

This module introduces the student to the third quantity of an AC Circuit-Capacitance. Topics include: How capacitance affects a circuit; Becoming familiar with capacitive reactance; Working safely with capacitors; Working with capacitors in series or parallel; Understanding vectors and how to use them effectively. Seven labs provide practical circuits for the student to analyse.

ELN 3125 Health and Safety

1 credits

This module introduces the student to Electrical Safety and Electrical Hazard Awareness. After completing this module, the student will be able to identify electrical hazards and understand their effects on the human body. The student will have the opportunity to examine many of the actual case studies included in this course. Topics include: American labour history; Electrical safety culture and Electrical hazard awareness; Design and work practice considerations; Layout of NFPA 70E; An overview of 70E concepts; Electrical safety programme and training requirements; Achieving an electrically safe work condition; Working on or near live parts; Approach boundaries to live parts; Personal and other protective equipment and protective clothing; Calculation of fault currents and implementation.

ELN 3126 Advanced Blueprint Reading: Industrial Specifications

1 credits

This module builds on all previous blueprint reading lessons. The student works with an actual set of industrial specifications and blueprints. With practice the student will be able to: read and understand general industrial specifications; understand and explain site plans; read and interpret feeder diagrams and panel schedules; comprehend and discuss electrical, power, lighting and communications drawings. Topics include: Review and introduction; Industrial Specifications; Industrial prints 1, 2 and 3.

ELN 3127 Semiconductor Theory

1 credits

This module introduces the student to semiconductor electronics. Understanding the basics of semiconductors is essential for proper installation and maintenance of today’s electrical systems. Topics include: Semiconductor diodes; Zener, light emitting and other diodes; Understanding the basic functions of diodes and rectifiers; Power supplies. Ten lab assignments give the student the hands-on training and capability to work safely and confidently on a variety of diodes and power supplies.

ELN 3128 BjTs, MOSFETs, and other Transistor Types

1 credits

This module introduces the student to more complicated electronic circuits involving PNP and NPN transistors along with JFETs, MOSFETs and other transistor types. Fifteen intensive lab assignments give the student the training and capability to apply theoretical principles to actual circuits found in industry. Topics include: JFETs, MOSFETs; VMOS Transistors; Amplifiers 1; Amplifiers 2.

ELN 3129 Differential & Operational Amplifiers

1 credits

This module builds on all previous lessons of the series on Semiconductor Electronics. Thirteen powerful and practical lab assignments give the student hands-on experience with actual circuits and devices found in residential, commercial and industrial applications. Topics include: Differential and operational amplifiers; Oscillators; The IC 555 timer; Electronic applications; Optoelectronics; Fibre optics.

ELN 3130 Grounding and bonding Fundamentals

1 credits

This is the first of series of twenty-two lessons that focus on the important subject of grounding and bonding as required by the NEC. The course begins with a review of electrical theory as it relates to the grounding of systems. Topics include: Grounding and bonding fundamentals; NEC system grounding; Grounding AC Systems; Grounding electrical services; Service equipment; Main bonding jumpers.

ELN 4137 Designing and Installing Lightning Protection Systems

1 credits

This module introduces the student to lightning protection and the devices used to wire a lightning protection system. In addition, the student will learn how to define the terms associated with lightning protection equipment and installation. Identify the different types of lightning protection systems and the parameters which define them. Follow general installation layout and design details for lightning protection systems. Topics include: Becoming familiar with lightning protection systems; Designing and installing lightning protection systems; Rules, acronyms, Glossary and formulas; Magnetism, Electromagnetism and Induction.

ELN 4138 AC Alternators

1 credits

This module introduces the student to the construction and operation of three-phase alternators and their ratings. The student will study and closely examine three-phase synchronous motors and analyse the various applications of the design and construction of polyphase motors with code letters A through F. Topics include: AC alternators; The rotating field in the polyphase motor; Polyphase motors; Wound-rotor motors; Synchronous motors; Alternating field in a single-phase motor.

ELN 4139 The Principles of Electronic Variable Speed-Control

1 credits

This module provides the student with detailed information about the design, construction and operating characteristics of a single phase motor. The split-phase, capacitor start, capacitor-start and run, shaded pole and repulsion type motors are given detailed attention. In addition, the student will study the principles of electronic variable speed motor control for AC motors and describe voltage-voltage and variable-frequency speed control methods. Topics include: Single-phase motors; DC motors; Principles of electronic variable-speed control; Electronic variable-speed drives; Other motors; Installing motors, pulleys and couplings.

ELN 4140 Motor Starters, Contactors and Control Relays

1 credits

This module will allow the student to explore the construction of starters, their purposes, uses and sizing. Internal components such as contacts and coils are examined in detail. In addition, the student will study contactor construction, operation and uses with focus on electromagnetic contactors and their use in motor starters. Topics include: History of motor control 1 & 2; Motor starters 1, 2 & 3; Contactors and control relays 1, 2 & 3.

ELN 4141 Manual and Automatic Operating Devices

1 credits

This module introduces the student to Manual Operating Devices, Automatic Operating Devices and Control Diagrams and Drawings. Topics include: Manual operating and indicating devices; Automatic operating devices; Control diagrams and drawings.

ELN 4142 Timing Devices and DC Motor Controls

1 credits

This module introduces the student to two and three wire control circuits; he/she will be able to explain automatic vs. semiautomatic control and draw ladder diagrams from a written description of process operation. In addition, the student will examine and study solid state timing devices and describe the special construction, sizing and operation of DC motor starters. Topics include: Control diagrams and drawings 4; Timing devices 1, 2 and 3; Special techniques and components 1, 2 and 3; DC motor controls 1 and 2.

ELN 5149 Keys to Success-Motivation and Leadership

1 credits

This module will teach the student about his/her new and more important role as an electrical journeyman, as a potential instructor, as a role model for apprentices and as a responsible and productive member of society. Topics include: After apprenticeship; Soon to be an Instructor; Keys to success-motivation and leadership; The economics of unemployment.

ELN 5150 Fire Alarm Systems

1 credits

This course has been developed to provide a high level of instruction to the Apprentice Level and Journeyman Level Installer. The student will learn the fundamentals of fire alarm systems; examine the basic signal types, circuit classes and styles and general principles of fire alarm signalling. Topics include: Introduction to fire alarm systems; Fundamentals of fire alarm systems; Initiating devices; Notification devices; Wiring and wiring methods; Inspection, Testing and maintenance; Interfaced systems; Supervising stations; NICET certification. Lab assignments give students the opportunity to work with the latest fire alarm equipment available to the job site.

ELN 5151 Introduction to Instrumentation

1 credits

This module introduces the student to the fundamentals of instrumentation which is the first step in learning the measurement and controls fields. Topics include: Introduction to instrumentation-definitions; Introduction to instrumentation-fundamentals; Understanding instrument symbols; Fundamentals of instrument calibration; Understanding calibration procedures; Fundamentals of pressure; Fundamentals of flow.

ELN 5152 Fundamentals of Controllers

1 credits

This course introduces the student to more advanced topics in Instrumentation. Topics include: The fundamentals of temperature; Pneumatics and control valves; Fundamentals of controllers; The smart instrument communicator; Fundamentals of smart instrument calibration; Fundamentals of instrument installation (Part 1) and (Part 2).

ELN 5153 Security Systems & Telephone Wiring

1 credits

This module introduces the student to security systems. While there are a number of systems available, this course uses the Sentrol ZX400/ZX410 as its source of information. The student will learn that this particular system is very much like many others and much of the knowledge obtained studying the Sentrol Security System is applicable to other security types as well. In addition, the student will study Telephone Wiring. Topics include: Basic security system; Magnetic contacts; Passive infrared motion detectors; Glassbreak sensors; Basic telephone wiring; Safety codes; TIA/EIA Standards and codes; Structured cabling systems.

ELN 5154 Structured Cabling Systems

1 credits

This module introduces the student to Structured Cabling Systems with special emphasis on TIA/EIA Standards. Topics include: Structured cabling system overview; Cabling system performance; Unshielded twisted pair cables; Unshielded twisted pair connecting hardware; Pathways and spaces; Telecommunications cabling administration; Telecommunications grounding and bonding; Residential telecommunications cabling.

ENG 1044 Communications for Industry I

3 credits

A course emphasising communication skills for industry, including reading and comprehension of printed material used in industry, interpreting graphs and charts, writing short reports, instructions and memos, and giving a short presentation. Students receive reinforcement in the practices of standard written English. Prerequisite: ENG 0002 with a grade of C or better or CPT scores in reading comprehension and sentence skills of 60 or higher. This course is a certificate course and will not normally transfer into degree programmes.

ENG 1111 Freshman Composition

3 credits

A course intended to prepare students for college writing and beyond. There is a focus on composition that includes writings such as essays (exemplification, cause-effect, process analysis, compare and contrast, division and classification etc.) editorials, manifestos, blogs etc. Students develop research and documentation skills (MLA) and apply them to required research papers and assignments. Prerequisites: A grade of “C” or better in ENG 0012 and ENG 0016 or satisfactory performance on the College Placement Test

ENG 1111 (C) Freshman Composition

3 credits

A course intended to prepare students for college writing and beyond. There is a focus on composition that includes writings such as essays (exemplification, cause-effect, process analysis, compare and contrast, division and classification etc.) editorials, manifestos, blogs etc. Students develop research and documentation skills (MLA) and apply them to required research papers and assignments. Prerequisites: A grade of “C” or better in ENG 0012 and ENG 0016 or satisfactory performance on the College Placement Test

ENG 1112 Literary Analysis

3 credits

An introduction to literary analysis that focuses on devices such as imagery, setting, character, point of view, theme, and figures of speech in selected works of prose, poetry, drama and short fiction. Students read works from different perspectives and prepare analytical and researched essays. Prerequisite: ENG 1111.

ENG 1115 Writing for Professionals

3 credits

A writing course designed for students who wish to develop the organisational techniques, style, and research skills appropriate to business and industry. Analysis will be emphasised. An investigative business report is required. Prerequisite: ENG 1111.

ENG 2203 Survey of English Literature I

3 credits

A critical and appreciative study of major British authors and types of literature including poetry, prose and drama from the Anglo-Saxon period to the eighteenth century. The works studied may vary year to year, but the course will look at works by the Beowulf poet, Chaucer, Shakespeare, Donne, Milton, Swift and Fielding. There will be some attention given to the historical context. Prerequisite: ENG 1112 or permission of the lecturer.

ENG 2212 Oral Communication

3 credits

A study of the theory and practice of public speaking. Levels of communication and their application. The focus is on preparing and delivering oral presentations. Prerequisite: ENG 1112 or ENG 1115.

ENG 2260 Studies in Bermudian Literature

3 credits

Bermuda's unique cultural and literary landscape will be explored through a study of fiction, poetry and drama by early and contemporary writers. The course will start by looking at the role in world literature played by the discovery of Bermuda and will go on to investigate the realities of the slave society. The complexities of twentieth and twenty-first century Bermuda will be the basis of the rest of the course that will feature the work of Brian Burland. Prerequisite: ENG 1112

FAB 1100 Food Service I

4 credits

Practical food, beverage and wine service skills and knowledge in a dining room, principles of merchandising and salesmanship, customer relations, forecasting and planning workloads and bar technology. Students are required to obtain the Federation of Dining Room Professionals Certified Dining Room Associate and the Associate Wine Steward certification.

FLM 1101 Introduction to Film Studies

3 credits

This course teaches the fundamental concepts and critical skills involved in interpreting film. Students shall participate in discussing and viewing films and clips; in addition, they are required to produce a series of critical essays and a film project.

FRE 1101 Beginner's French I

3 credits



FRE 1102 Beginner's French II

3 credits



HIS 1140 World History I

3 credits

A survey of world history from the spread of Islam to the era of European global expansion. The course uses primary and secondary material in an attempt to understand the social, political, intellectual and cultural development of civilisations around the world. Corequisite: ENG 1111 is required.

HMT 1155 Introduction to the Hospitality Industry

3 credits

This course is designed to provide an overview, and a fundamental understanding of the basic principles, practices and concepts of the hospitality industry

HMT 1265 Hospitality Sales and Marketing

3 credits

A broad perspective of hospitality marketing, placing emphasis on the analysis, structure, and strategy of the hospitality marketing department, allocation of resources, marketing research, and the effectiveness of the marketing plan. It will also take an in-depth study into the promotional tool of personal selling, target marketing, product positioning, with an emphasis on identifying and meeting the sales needs of the customer. Prerequisite: At least 18 credits in the Associate in Hospitality Management.

HVA 1101 Fundamentals of Heating and Cooling

5 credits

The following skills are contained in this module: Describe basic principles of HVAC; Complete basic trade calculations; Use Ohm’s Law to analyse electrical circuits; Analyse the refrigeration cycle; Describe operation of furnaces.

HVA 1105 Senior Student Project I

2 credits

This module will consist of a hands-on project in the workshop to develop students’ practical application of theory learned in the first two semesters of the programme. The project will vary each year according to grants received from ASHRAE. Requirements include a progress report to be sent to ASHRAE at the end of the semester.

HVA 1106 Troubleshooting Heating

3 credits

The following topics are contained in this module: Perform preventive maintenance; Apply troubleshooting techniques; Troubleshoot electronic controls, gas, oil and electric heating systems.

HVA 2107 Troubleshooting Cooling

3 credits

The following topics are contained in this module: Troubleshoot cooling equipment, heat pumps and accessories.

HVA 2108 Hydronics

2 credits

The following topics are contained in this module: Service commercial hydronic systems; Balance air and water systems; Maintain steam systems.

HVA 2111 Energy Management

3 credits

The following topics are contained in this module: Explain energy management; Maintain water quality; Start-up and shutdown commercial systems.

HVA 2112 System Design

3 credits

The following topics are contained in this module: Calculate heat loads; Identify cold storage equipment.

INS 1101 Introduction to Risk and Insurance

3 credits

Key concepts and legal principles in risk management and insurance are taught. Government regulations and the social and economic significance of the insurance industry are also explored.

MAT 1034 Business Mathematics

3 credits

Topics include bank services, payroll calculations, mathematics of buying and selling, simple and compound interest, business and consumer loans, depreciation. Prerequisite: A grade of C or better in MAT 0010 or satisfactory performance on College Placement Test. This course is a certificate course and will not normally transfer into degree programmes.

MAT 1105 College Algebra I

3 credits

Intended to provide exposure to a number of mathematical topics at college level for those students who do not wish a concentration in mathematics but who need to improve their competency in intermediate algebra. Such topics will include a review of intermediate algebra, including absolute value, domain and range of functions, symmetry, graphs of polynomials and other functions. Prerequisite: A grade of C or better in MAT 0015 or satisfactory performance on College Placement Test. Successor: MAT 1141, MAT 1151.

MAT 1105 (C) College Algebra

3 credits

Intended to provide exposure to a number of mathematical topics at college level for those students who do not wish a concentration in mathematics but who need to improve their competency in intermediate algebra. Such topics will include absolute values, domain and range of functions, symmetry, graphs, horizontal and vertical translations and the study of roots of polynomials. Prerequisite: A grade of “C” or better in MAT 0015 Successor: MAT 1141, MAT 1152.

MAT 1107 A Survey of Mathematics

3 credits

An introductory course in mathematics covering topics in set theory, Venn Diagrams, logic, consumer mathematics, as well as other selected topics including, but not limited to, finite mathematical systems and graph theory. Prerequisite: A grade of C or better in MAT 0015 or satisfactory performance on College Placement Test.

MAT 1131 Finite Mathematics

3 credits

Intended for business students needing to develop a facility with certain techniques to solve practical problems. Includes systems of linear equations and inequalities, optimisation, supply and demand analysis, linear programming, mix of constraints, matrix algebra, sinking funds, amortisation, future value of ordinary annuities. Prerequisite: A grade of C or better in MAT 0015 or satisfactory performance on College Placement Test. Successor: MAT 1132.

MAT 1132 Business Calculus

3 credits

Intended for business students using calculus as a tool with particular applications in management and economics. includes exponential and logarithmic functions, elementary differential calculus, applications to maxima and minima, cost analysis, marginal propensity to consume and the multiplier, integral calculus, area between two curves, simple differential equations, optimisation of profit. Prerequisite: MAT 1131.

MAT 1141 Pre-Calculus

3 credits

A continuation of the study of topics in algebra, in addition to topics in trigonometry recommended for students of calculus, or those seeking a concentration in mathematics or science. Includes the study of roots of polynomial equations, the Remainder Theorem, exponential and logarithmic functions and equations, graphs of trigonometric functions, trigonometric equations, compound angles, sine and cosine formulae. Prerequisite: MAT 1105 or satisfactory performance on College Placement Test. Successor: MAT 1152.

MAT 2201 Calculus II

3 credits

Intended as a continuation of MAT 1152 for students taking a concentration in science and/or mathematics. Includes inverse trigonometric and hyperbolic functions, techniques of integration, indeterminate forms, tests for convergence of series, Taylor series. Prerequisite: MAT 1152. Successor: MAT 2220.

MAT 2210 Linear Algebra

3 credits

Intended to provide a comprehensive understanding of the theory and applications of matrices, particularly for the aspiring scientist and mathematician. Includes systems of linear equations, vector spaces, Gram-Schmidt process, linear transformations, matrices, determinants, eigenvalues and eigenvectors, real quadratic forms. Prerequisites: MAT 1141 and MAT 1152.

MAT 2233 Statistics I

3 credits

Intended for students requiring a background in descriptive statistics and elementary sampling theory. Includes characteristics of frequency distributions, measures of central location and variability, probability and probability distributions, sampling theory and sampling distributions. Applications are taken from business, management, social science and science. Prerequisite: 15 credits at the 1100-level, three of which must be an 1100-level math course. Successor: MAT 2234.

MAT 2234 Statistics II

3 credits

A continuation of MAT 2233 covering methods of statistical inference. Includes estimation, hypothesis testing, chi square, and analysis of variance, linear regression and correlation. Applications are taken from business, management, social science and natural science. Prerequisite: MAT 2233.

MGN 1114 Introduction to Business

3 credits

This course provides an introduction to business concepts and functions. Topics covered include: ethics and social responsibility, forms of business ownership, small business and entrepreneurship, management and organisation of the firm, marketing, operations, finance, and human resources. Emphasis will be placed upon the discussion of current issues and trends relating to these topics. Case study analysis will be introduced. Prerequisite: ENG 0012.

MGN 2210 Marketing Management I

3 credits

An introduction to marketing that examines the marketing concept, the consumer, marketing opportunities, target marketing and the four components of the marketing mix, i.e. price, product, place and promotion. Prerequisite: MGN 1114.

MGN 2240 Finance I

3 credits

The course provides an in-depth study of the techniques required for managerial decision-making in the financial area. Topics include: Mathematics of finance; Financial analysis; Financial management; Interest rate theories; Working capital management; Short-term financing and capital markets. Prerequisites: ACC 1145 and MAT 1131.

MGN 2245 Introduction to Small Business Management

3 credits

This course introduces the student to interrelated operations of a small business. The content covers the essentials of starting a small business from the generation of the idea through the completion of the business plan, as well as the practical aspects of the day to day operation. Prerequisite: MGN 1114.

MGN 2250 Introduction to International Business

3 credits

An introduction to the world of international business and Bermuda’s role in the global economy. The course will raise students’ levels of awareness and understanding of the way business is conducted worldwide. Topics such as the Role of International Business in Bermuda’s economy; Cross-cultural Communication and Management; International Marketing and Finance; and the Structure of the Multinational Organisation will be covered. Prerequisite: MGN 1114.

MSC 1103 Music Appreciation

3 credits

A historical survey of the development of western music and its composers from the medieval period to jazz. Emphasis is placed on how the elements of music change and develop throughout history. This course involves extensive listening and live concert attendance.

MSC 1204 Piano Skills I

3 credits

Group instruction and performance in the beginning level of piano skills and musicianship.

MVT 1104 Electrical Systems

3 credits

The following topics are contained in this module: Testing and diagnosing of electrical systems; Identifying electrical principles; Diagnosing and testing electrical circuits.

MVT 1105 Battery/Charging Systems

3 credits

The following topics are contained in this module: Perform diagnosis and service of batteries; Testing charging systems.

MVT 1106 Starting Systems

3 credits

The following topics are contained in this module: Identify starter systems; Inspect testing and disassemble of starter systems; Perform repairs on starter systems.

MVT 2107 Braking Systems

1 credits

The following topics are contained in this module: Perform diagnostic tests on braking systems; Investigate the operation of disc and drum brake systems.

MVT 2108 Hydraulic Brake Systems

1 credits

The following topics are contained in this module: Perform repairs on hydraulic brake systems; Adjust hydraulic brake systems.

MVT 2109 Anti-Lock Brake Systems

1 credits

The following topics are contained in this module: Perform diagnostic test and repairs on power assisted and antilock brake systems; Service antilock brake systems

NCC 1101 Basic Safety

1 credits

Complies with OSHA-10 training requirements. Explains the safety obligations of workers, supervisors, and managers to ensure a safe workplace. Discusses the causes and results of accidents and the impact of accident costs. Reviews the role of company policies and OSHA regulations. Introduces common job-site hazards and identifies proper protections. Defines safe work procedures, proper use of personal protective equipment, and working with hazardous chemicals. Identifies other potential construction hazards, including hazardous material exposures, welding and cutting hazards, and confined spaces.

NCC 1102 Mathematics

1 credits

Reviews basic mathematical functions such as adding, subtracting, dividing, and multiplying whole numbers, fractions and decimals, and explains their applications to the construction trades. Explains how to use and read various length measurement tools, including standard and metric rulers and tape measures, and the architect’s and engineer’s scales. Explains decimal-fraction conversions and the metric system, using practical examples. Also reviews basic geometry as applied to common shapes and forms.

NCC 1103 Hand Tools

1 credits

Introduces trainees to hand tools that are widely used in the construction industry, such as hammers, saws, levels, pullers, and clamps. Explains the specific applications of each tool and shows how to use them properly. Also discusses important safety and maintenance issues related to hand tools.

NCC 1104 Power Tools

1 credits

Provides detail descriptions of commonly used power tools, such as drills, saws, grinders, and sanders. Reviews applications, proper use, safety, and maintenance. Many illustrations show power tools used in on-the-job settings.

NCC 1105 Introduction to Construction Drawings

1 credits

Familiarises trainees with basic terms for construction drawings, components, and symbols. Explains the different types of drawings (civil, architectural, structural, mechanical, plumbing/piping, electrical, and fire protection) and instructs trainees on how to interpret and use drawing dimensions. Four oversized drawings are included.

NCC 1107 Basic Communication Skills

1 credits

Provides trainees with techniques for communicating effectively with co-workers and supervisors. Includes practical examples that emphasise the importance of verbal and written information and instructions on the job. Also discusses effective telephone and e-mail communication skills.

NCC 1108 Employability Skills

1 credits

Identifies the roles of individuals and companies in the construction industry. Introduces trainees to critical thinking and problem solving skills and computer systems and their industry applications. Also reviews effective relationship skills, effective self-presentation and key workplace issues such as sexual harassment, stress and substance abuse.

NCC 1109 Introduction to Material Handling

1 credits

Recognises hazards associated with materials handling and explains proper materials handling techniques and procedures. Also introduces materials handling equipment and identifies appropriate equipment for common job-site tasks.

NCC 1110 Introduction to Construction Technology and Trades/Technical Job Skills

5 credits

This course will provide students with an appreciation for modern technology, trades and engineering. Topics covered will be basic safety, hand and power tools, employability skills, and materials handling. Also an introduction to technical skills required for the various technical occupations/trades with an introduction to plumbing, HVAC, automotive and electrical systems.

NUR 1150 Nursing Fundamentals

8 credits

Students in Nursing 1150 will acquire fundamental psychomotor, critical thinking and communication skills through student participation in classroom, skills lab, and clinical activities. Students learn basic assessment skills and nursing procedures utilizing values and ethics necessary for practice focusing on gerontological nursing care.

NUR 2240 Family Health Nursing

5 credits

The course introduces the student to management of complex health issues applied to clients across the lifespan. A focus is on family education, cultural competency and sensitivity to values and ethical concerns of the child bearing family. Students will be introduced to care of the client pre and post-delivery with an increased focus on family-centred care. In the clinical setting, students demonstrate an ability to apply the nursing process to the care of individuals and families. Skill development reflects psychomotor, cognitive and affective domains of learning necessary for critical thinking, therapeutic communication, teaching and learning, with an introduction to leadership. In this course, students are introduced to the practice of nursing in the home and community based settings. Prerequisite: A grade of B- or better in NUR 2240 and NUR 2250.

NUR 2250 Adult Health

5 credits

This course focuses on the etiologic, symptomatologic and pathologic aspects of selected human diseases across the life span. Concepts of health promotion, disease prevention, disease progression, and treatment are approached from a cellular and multisystem perspective. Influences of genetic, ethnic, and cultural variables on human diseases is analysed. Application and analysis of the therapeutic management of complex health issues are applied to clients across the lifespan. A focus is on family education, cultural competency and sensitivity to values and ethical concerns. 2 credit hours of classroom and 2 credit hours of clinical (90 hours of clinical per semester).

OFA 1040 Communication and Presentation Skills

2 credits

This course provides training in oral and written communication skills necessary in the workplace. Presentation software will be utilised. Prerequisite: Basic computer skills. This course is a certificate course and will not normally transfer into degree programmes.

PHL 1104 Introduction to Philosophy: Ethics and the Nature of Man

3 credits

This course addresses the questions, 'What is Human?', 'How does humanity differ from other animals?', 'Are we truly free?', 'What are our responsibilities and ethical obligations, or Where do these obligations come from?'. Answers to these questions are pursued through a historical and contemporary study of Ethics, Identity, the Mind-Body Problem, or Free Will and Determinism.

PHY 1121 Principles of Physics I

4 credits

A course in fundamental principles and applications of physics, introducing the basic concepts and principles of mechanics and thermodynamics. Topics include: Equations of motion; Newton’s Laws of motion; Transnational and rotational equilibrium; Work; Energy; Momentum; Heat, Kinetic gas theory; The gas laws. Suitable for students intending to pursue other scientific studies or wishing to specialise in physics and its related technologies. Laboratory. Prerequisite: C grade in PHY 0013, or alternatives in Physics and Mathematics. Corequisite: MAT 1141.

PLM 1101 Introduction to the Plumbing Profession, Safety and Tools

4 credits

This module reviews the basic plumbing tools used to measure, lay out, cut, drill, bore, and ream. Trainees will learn how to safely use, properly care for, and maintain plumbing tools.

PLM 1102 Plastic pipe, Copper, Cast Iron, Steel Pipe and Fittings

2 credits

Introduces trainees to the different types of plastic pipe and fittings used in plumbing applications, including ABS, PVC, CPVC.

PLM 1103 Fixtures and Faucets, Drain, Waste and Vent systems

2 credits

Explains how DWV systems remove waste safely and effectively. Discusses how system components, such as pipe, drains, traps and vents work.

PLM 2107 Sizing Water Supply Piping, Potable Water Treatment

3 credits

Explains how to disinfect, filter, and soften water supply systems. Discusses how to troubleshoot water supply problems, flush out visible contaminants from a plumbing system, and disinfect a potable water plumbing system.

PLM 2108 Backflow Preventers, Types of Venting, Sizing DWV Systems

4 credits

Reviews the different types of vents that can be installed in a DWV System and how they work. Also teaches design and installation techniques.

PLM 2109 Sewage Pumps, Compressed Air

2 credits

Explains the installation, diagnosis, and repair of pumps and controls in a water system.

PSY 1101 Introduction to Psychology I

3 credits

A survey of the conceptual approaches in psychology: biological bases of behaviour, perception, consciousness (sleep, dreams, hypnosis, meditation), learning, language, basic drives (hunger, thirst, sex), motivation, emotion and intelligence. Prerequisite: ENG 0012 with a grade of C or higher.

PSY 2210 Introduction to Social Psychology

3 credits

An examination of human behaviour covering such topics as conformity, altruism, impression formation, aggression, prejudice, love and attraction attitudes, and organisational behaviour. Emphasis is placed on understanding the connection between sociological and psychological determinants of normal and abnormal behaviour. Prerequisites: PSY 1101 and PSY 1102.

PSY 2270 Learning Theory

3 credits

An examination of developmental issues influencing learning, including cognitive, personal, moral, physiological, and neuro-physiological. Specific learning theories covered include classical and operant conditioning, cognitive theories, and social learning theories. Prerequisites: PSY 1101 and PSY 1102.

REL 1102 Introduction to Religious Studies II

3 credits

A comparative study of Judaism, Christianity and Islam. Prerequisite: REL 1101 is highly recommended.

SOC 1101 Introduction to Sociology

3 credits

An introduction to the study of human society from the sociological perspective. Emphasises the nature and meaning of society, culture, status and role, socialisation and personality, deviance, and social stratification. Prerequisite: ENG 0012 with a grade of C or higher.

SOC 1102 Introduction to Sociology II

3 credits

An introduction to the study of human society from the sociological perspective. Emphasises the nature and meaning of social institutions (the family, religion, education, and economy and politics), formal and informal organisations, and social change. Prerequisite: ENG 0012 with a grade of C or higher. SOC 1101 is strongly recommended.

SOC 2220 Social Inequality

3 credits

An examination of the origins and nature of the principal types of social inequality including sex, caste, class and race. Deals particularly with studies of status in modern industrial societies and in Bermudian society. Prerequisites: SOC 1101 and SOC 1102.

SOC 2280 Sociology of Deviant Behaviour

3 credits

An examination of the nature of deviance and its sociological explanations through analysis of selected topics such as mental illness, violence, sexual deviance and drug abuse. Also examined are social responses to deviance including stigmatisation, treatment and social control. Prerequisites: SOC 1101 and 1102.

SPA 1101 Beginners Spanish I

3 credits

This course is a foundational course designed for students who have little or no Spanish-speaking skills previously, for students who have minimal knowledge of basic concepts of the language, or for students who have formerly studied Spanish, but who have a three-year or more gap in their schooling experience, or for those who desire a basic refresher course and re-introduction to the Spanish language. Course content will include vocabulary building, reading, speaking, writing with an emphasis on building basic writing skills and audio-lingual development.

SPA 1102 Beginners Spanish II

3 credits

This course is a continuation of Beginners Spanish 1 (SPA 1101). It is designed for students who have had at least two years of Spanish at the secondary school level without any gaps in their Spanish educational experience, or for students who are competent in the basic linguistic skills and who can minimally converse in Spanish, but who desire increased competency in the fundamentals of the language. The course is designed to build on the basics of the language and aims to increase audio-lingual development through vocabulary building, reading, speaking, and writing to prepare students for the intermediate level. Prerequisite: SPA 1101 or permission of the lecturer.

SPA 2201 Intermediate Spanish I

3 credits

This course focuses on intermediate-level Spanish and is designed for students who have studied Spanish for a minimum of three years at the senior school level or for students who have a command of the basics of the language and who desire to strengthen their reading, writing and audio lingual skills. Students will learn more complex verb forms and idiomatic expressions to develop greater linguistic fluency and will strengthen their skills through the study of authentic text. Prerequisite: SPA 1102, or at least three (3) consecutive years in senior school Spanish or permission from the lecturer.

TEC 1000 Introduction to Computer Aided Technical Drawing

3 credits

An introduction to computer aided drafting software applications, two dimensional and three dimensional drafting design techniques, using CAD software for creating designing and printing, various designs, shapes, parts and functional objects.

TEC 1002 Introduction to Programming for Technicians

3 credits

This introductory programming course will provide students with basic computing problem solving skills using the Python programming language. Students will develop, compile, debug, and execute programs while learning basic programming terminology and concepts such as procedure definition, algorithms, functions, conditional statements, and object-oriented programming concepts.

TEC 1010 Introduction to Engineering and Design

3 credits

This is an introductory course to engineering technology that provides students with an appreciation of the various engineering disciplines, problem solving and technical design process, students will develop practical solutions to real world problems.

TMM 1001 Technical Math I

3 credits

This course will provide students with a practical application of mathematical skills as it relates to technology. Some of the topics to be studied are a review of basic math skills, measurements and units, algebra essentials, Cartesian coordinates, systems of equations, plane and solid geometry, trigonometry, vectors, binary and hexadecimal numbers, and Boolean algebra.

TSM 1101 Technical Science I

4 credits

This module is an introduction to applied science skills for the technical trades. It applies the principles of: Basic botany; Force and motion; Simple machines; Thermodynamics and electricity and magnetism.

WLD 1101 Introduction to Welding

3 credits

A module that provides the basic understanding of welding operations and processes.

WTC 1101 Orientation, Materials, Fasteners, hand & Power Tools

1 credits

The following topics are contained in this module: Studying history of the trade; Identifying different materials and fasteners; Operating tools safely.

WTC 1102 Floor, Wall, Ceiling and Roof Framing

4 credits

The following topics are contained in this module: Laying out and constructing a wood floor; Framing walls and ceilings; Describing various kinds of roofs; Building gable and hip roofs.

WTC 1103 Windows and Exterior Doors

4 credits

The following topics are contained in this module: Recognising various types of windows; Skylights and exterior doors; Installing windows and exterior doors; Fitting locksets and weather-stripping.

WTC 2107 Exterior Finishing, Roofing Applications, Thermal and Moisture Protection

4 credits

The following topics are contained in this module: Learning types and installation procedures of several sidings; Roofing materials; Insulation and waterproofing materials.

WTC 2108 Framing with Metal Studs, Drywall Installation & Finishing...

4 credits

The following topics are contained in this module: Selecting and installing metal framing; Installing drywall on walls and ceilings; Patching and finish gypsum drywall; Laying out and installing suspended ceilings.

WTC 2109 Stair, Interior Finish One, Interior Finish Three and Interior Finish Four

4 credits

The following topics are contained in this module: Constructing wood stairs; Installing wooden doors; Fitting base and wall cabinets; Installing interior trim.